ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Collection
Publisher
Years
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2019-02-01
    Description: Highlights: • Identify 3 groups of gas migration structures in seismic data from the Danube Fan. • Migration structures related to shallow gas migration and flares at the seafloor. • Gas migration is controlled by lithological heterogeneity and sediment deformation. • Mass transport deposits play a role in controlling vertical migration occurrence. Abstract: A large geophysical dataset, including bathymetry, and 2D and 3D P-cable seismic data, revealed evidence of numerous gas flares near the S2 Canyon in the Danube Fan, northwestern Black Sea. This dataset allows us to investigate potential relationships between gas migration pathways, gas vents observed at the seafloor and submarine slope failures. Vertical gas migration structures as revealed in the seismics appear to be concentrated near submarine slope failure structures. Where these seismically defined features extend upwards to the seafloor, they correlate with the location of gas flares. However, not all these structures reach the seafloor, in some cases because they are capped by overlying sediments. A strong correlation is inferred between gas migration pathways, heterogeneous mass transport deposits and contacts between adjacent units of contrasting lithology. Although missing age constrains prevent a final judgement, we discuss the potential relationship between submarine slope failures and gas migration in order to determine if gas migration is a precursor to failure, or if the presence of slope failures and associated mass transport deposits facilitates the migration of gas. Our observations indicate that lithological heterogeneity, mass transport deposits and minor sediment deformation control gas migration pathways and the formation of gas chimney-like features. Gas migration is focused and gradual, resulting in gas flares where the chimney-like features extend to the seafloor, with no evidence of erosive features such as pockmarks.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/article
    Format: text
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2019-09-25
    Description: Highlights • There is direct and indirect evidence for hydrate occurrence in several areas around Europe. • Hydrate is particularly widespread offshore Norway and Svalbard and in the Black Sea. • Hydrate occurrence often coincides with conventional thermogenic hydrocarbon provinces. • The regional abundance of hydrate in Europe is poorly known. Abstract Large national programs in the United States and several Asian countries have defined and characterised their marine methane hydrate occurrences in some detail, but European hydrate occurrence has received less attention. The European Union-funded project “Marine gas hydrate – an indigenous resource of natural gas for Europe” (MIGRATE) aimed to determine the European potential inventory of exploitable gas hydrate, to assess current technologies for their production, and to evaluate the associated risks. We present a synthesis of results from a MIGRATE working group that focused on the definition and assessment of hydrate in Europe. Our review includes the western and eastern margins of Greenland, the Barents Sea and onshore and offshore Svalbard, the Atlantic margin of Europe, extending south to the northwestern margin of Morocco, the Mediterranean Sea, the Sea of Marmara, and the western and southern margins of the Black Sea. We have not attempted to cover the high Arctic, the Russian, Ukrainian and Georgian sectors of the Black Sea, or overseas territories of European nations. Following a formalised process, we defined a range of indicators of hydrate presence based on geophysical, geochemical and geological data. Our study was framed by the constraint of the hydrate stability field in European seas. Direct hydrate indicators included sampling of hydrate; the presence of bottom simulating reflectors in seismic reflection profiles; gas seepage into the ocean; and chlorinity anomalies in sediment cores. Indirect indicators included geophysical survey evidence for seismic velocity and/or resistivity anomalies, seismic reflectivity anomalies or subsurface gas escape structures; various seabed features associated with gas escape, and the presence of an underlying conventional petroleum system. We used these indicators to develop a database of hydrate occurrence across Europe. We identified a series of regions where there is substantial evidence for hydrate occurrence (some areas offshore Greenland, offshore west Svalbard, the Barents Sea, the mid-Norwegian margin, the Gulf of Cadiz, parts of the eastern Mediterranean, the Sea of Marmara and the Black Sea) and regions where the evidence is more tenuous (other areas offshore Greenland and of the eastern Mediterranean, onshore Svalbard, offshore Ireland and offshore northwest Iberia). We provide an overview of the evidence for hydrate occurrence in each of these regions. We conclude that around Europe, areas with strong evidence for the presence of hydrate commonly coincide with conventional thermogenic hydrocarbon provinces.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/article
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...