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  • 1
    Call number: AWI Bio-24-95729
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: XIV, 354 Seiten , Illustrationen
    ISBN: 0195154312 , 9780195154313 , 978-0-19-515431-3
    Series Statement: Long-Term Ecological Research Network Series
    Language: English
    Note: Contents Contributors Part I. Alaska's Past and Present Environment 1. The Conceptual Basis of LTER Studies in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / F. Stuart Chapin III, john Yarie, Keith Van Cleve, and Leslie A. Viereck 2. Regional Overview of Interior Alaska / James E. Beget, David Stone, and David L Verbyla 3. State Factor Control of Soil Formation in Interior Alaska / Chien-Lu Ping, Richard D. Boone, Marcus H. Clark, Edmond C. Packee, and David K. Swanson 4. Climate and Permafrost Dynamics of the Alaskan Boreal Forest / Larry D. Hinzman, Leslie A. Viereck, Phyllis C. Adams, Vladimir E. Romanovsky, and Kenji Yoshikawa 5. Holocene Development of the Alaskan Boreal Forest / Andrea H. Lloyd, Mary E. Edwards, Bruce P. Finney, Jason A. Lynch, Valerie Barber, and Nancy H. Bigelow Part II. Forest Dynamics 6. Floristic Diversity and Vegetation Distribution in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / F. Stuart Chapin III, Teresa Hollingsworth, David F. Murray, Leslie A. Viereck, and Marilyn D. Walker 7. Successional Processes in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / F. Stuart Chapin III, Leslie A. Viereck, Phyllis C. Adams, Keith Van Cleve, Christopher L. Fastie, Robert A. Ott, Daniel Mann, and Jill F. Johnstone 8. Mammalian Herbivore Population Dynamics in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / Eric Rexstad and Knut Kielland 9. Dynamics of Phytophagous Insects and Their Pathogens in Alaskan Boreal Forests / Richard A. Werner, Kenneth F. Raffa, and Barbara L. Illman 10. Running Waters of the Alaskan Boreal Forest / Mark W. Oswood, Nicholas F. Hughes, and Alexander M. Milner Part III. Ecosystem Dynamics 11. Controls over Forest Production in Interior Alaska / John Yarie and Keith Van Cleve 12. The Role of Fine Roots in the Functioning of Alaskan Boreal Forests / Roger W. Ruess, Ronald L. Hendrick, Jason C. Vogel, and Bjartmar Sveinbjornsson 13. Mammalian Herbivory, Ecosystem Engineering, and Ecological Cascades in Alaskan Boreal Forests / Knut Kielland, John P. Bryant, and Roger W. Ruess 14. Microbial Processes in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / Joshua P. Schimel and F. Stuart Chapin III 15. Patterns of Biogeochemistry in Alaskan Boreal Forests / David W. Valentine, Knut Kielland, F. Stuart Chapin III, A. David McCuire, and Keith Van Cleve Part IV. Changing Regional Processes 16. Watershed Hydrology and Chemistry in the Alaskan Boreal Forest: The Central Role of Permafrost / Larry D. Hinzman, W. Robert Bolton, Kevin C. Petrone, Jeremy B. Jones, and Phyllis C. Adams 17. Fire Trends in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / Eric S. Kasischke, T. Scott Rupp, and David L. Verbyla 18. Timber Harvest in Interior Alaska / Tricia L. Wurtz, Robert A. Ott, and John C. Maisch 19. Climate Feedbacks in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / A. David McCuire and F. Stuart Chapin III 20. Communication of Alaskan Boreal Science with Broader Communities / Elena B. Sparrow, Janice C. Dawe, and F. Stuart Chapin III 21. Summary and Synthesis: Past and Future Changes in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / F. Stuart Chapin III, A. David McCuire, Roger W. Ruess, Marilyn W. Walker, Richard D. Boone, Mary E. Edwards, Bruce P. Finney, Larry D. Hinzman, Jeremy B. Jones, Clenn P. Juday, Eric S. Kasischke, Knut Kielland, Andrea H. Lloyd, Mark W. Oswood, Chien-Lu Ping, Eric Rexstad, Vladimir E. Romanovsky, Joshua P. Schimel, Elena B. Sparrow, Bjartmar Sveinbjornsson, David W. Valentine, Keith Van Cleve, David L. Verbyla, Leslie A. Viereck, Richard A. Werner, Tricia L. Wurtz, and John Yarie Index
    Location: AWI Reading room
    Branch Library: AWI Library
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  • 2
    Call number: IASS 17.91030
    Description / Table of Contents: Arctic Sustainability Research- Front Cover -- Arctic Sustainability Research -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List of figures -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1: Background and purpose -- Note -- Chapter 2: A brief history of sustainability as a concept in the Arctic and beyond -- 2.1 Conceptual beginnings in "Western" thought and early nature protection -- 2.2 Sustainability in the Arctic -- 2.3 Indigenous/local concepts of sustainability and sustainable development -- 2.4 Towards Arctic-based discourses of sustainability -- Notes -- Chapter 3: ICARP II Science Plans: Reflection and assessment -- 3.1 ICARP II Science Plan 1. Arctic economies and sustainable development -- 3.2 ICARP II Science Plan 2. Indigenous peoples: Adaptation, adjustment, and empowerment -- 3.3 ICARP II Science Plan 10. Rapid change, resilience and vulnerability of social-ecological systems of the Arctic -- 3.4 ICARP II Science Plan 11. Arctic science in the public interest -- Chapter 4: Progress in Arctic sustainability research 1: Theoretical developments in Arctic sustainability science -- 4.1 Progress and milestones -- 4.2 Vulnerability, resilience, and sustainability -- 4.3 Vulnerability assessment -- 4.4 Resilience -- 4.5 Arctic sustainability governance -- Chapter 5: Progress in Arctic sustainability research 2: Methodological advances -- 5.1 Transition to more integrated, inter- and transdisciplinary and mixed-method research -- 5.2 Conceptualizing sustainability as both process and outcome -- 5.3 Co-production of knowledge and community-based research -- Chapter 6: Progress in Arctic sustainability research 3: Sustainability indicators -- 6.1 Global sustainability indicator initiatives -- 6.2 Challenges to developing Arctic sustainable development indicators -- Notes
    Description / Table of Contents: Chapter 7: Different spatial scales, global, national, regional, local, and their interconnections with Arctic and non-Arctic regions -- 7.1 Multi-scale sustainability studies within social science -- 7.2 Multi-scale sustainability studies involving natural and social science -- 7.3 Avenues for future research at different scales -- Chapter 8: Agenda 2025: Perspectives on gaps and future research priorities in Arctic sustainability research -- 8.1 Key developments and progress in Arctic sustainability research -- 8.2 Key knowledge gaps -- 8.3 Priorities: Agenda 2025 -- Note -- References -- Index
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 109 Seiten , Illustrationen
    ISBN: 9781138088306 (hbk) , 9781351614627 (ebk)
    Series Statement: Routledge Research in Polar Regions
    Language: English
    Branch Library: RIFS Library
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1365-2486
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology , Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering , Geography
    Notes: Assessments of carbon (C) fluxes in the Arctic require detailed data on both how and why these fluxes vary across the landscape. Such assessments are complicated because tundra vegetation has diverse structure and function at both local and regional scales. To investigate this diversity, the Arctic Flux Study has used the eddy covariance technique to generate ecosystem CO2-exchange data along a transect in northern Alaska. We use an extant process-based model of the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum to make independent predictions of gross photosynthesis and foliar respiration at 9 of the sites along the transect, using data on local canopy structure and meteorology. We make two key assumptions: (i) soil respiration is constant throughout the flux measurement period, so that the diurnal cycle in CO2 exchange is driven by canopy processes only (except at two sites where a soil respiration–temperature relationship was indicated in the data); and (ii) mosses and lichens play an insignificant role in ecosystem C exchange, even though in some locations their live biomass exceeds 300 g m−2. We found that even with these assumptions the model could explain much of the dynamics of net ecosystem production (NEP) at sites with widely differing vegetation structure and moss/lichen cover. Errors were mostly associated with the predictions of maximum NEP; the likely cause of such discrepancies was (i) a mismatch between vegetation sampled for characterizing the canopy structure and that contained within the footprint of the eddy covariance flux measurements, or (ii) an increase in daytime soil and root respiration. Thus the model results tended to falsify our first assumption but not our second. We also note evidence for an actual reduction in NEP caused by water stress on warm, dry days at some sites. The model–flux comparison also suggests that photosynthesis may be less sensitive to low temperatures than leaf-level gas-exchange measurements have indicated.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] Human alteration of the global environment has triggered the sixth major extinction event in the history of life and caused widespread changes in the global distribution of organisms. These changes in biodiversity alter ecosystem processes and change the resilience of ecosystems to environmental ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 377 (1995), S. 199-200 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] THE paper by Northup et all on page 227 of this issue shows for the first time that a pine (Finns muricata) can strongly influ-ence release of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in soils through the production of polyphenols in leaf litter. This result pro-vides fresh evidence that DON ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1432-1939
    Keywords: Key wordsHeliocarpuspallidus ; Caesalpiniaeriostachys ; Light Nutrients ; Competition ; Root foraging
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract We evaluated (1) the responses of two co-occurring tropical tree species, Heliocarpuspallidus and Caesalpiniaeriostachys, to changes in light, (2) the ability of these species to search for and exploit a fertilized soil patch, (3) the relationship between the capacity to forage for a fertilized patch and the capacity to respond to changes in light availability and (4) how the relationship between light and nutrient acquisition influenced the competitive interactions between these species. Plants of the two species were exposed to a factorial combination of high (H) and low (L) light intensity and fertilized (+Fp) and unfertilized (−Fp) nutrient patches for 50 days. Half of the plants from H were then transferred to L (HL treatment), and half of the plants from L were transferred to H (LH). The remaining plants were kept in their original light condition and grown for another 50 days. Plants were grown in these light and patch treatments alone (one plant per pot) and in interspecific competition (one plant per species resulting in two plants per pot). Both species exploited fertilized patches by increasing root biomass and length in the patch. This enhanced plant productivity and growth rate mainly under LH and HH conditions for Heliocarpus and the HH condition for Caesalpinia). When plants in the HH light environment were grown with an unfertilized patch, plant biomass and relative growth rates (RGRs) were even lower than␣under the LL light environment [(HH–Fp)〈LL]. However, the combined activity of shoot and roots when above- and below-ground resources were temporally and spatially heterogeneous influenced plant productivity and growth rate. The benefit from light increase (LH) was reduced when grown with an unfertilized patch. Larger reductions in root biomass, length and density in the patch, and in plant biomass and RGR, were exhibited by Heliocarpus than by Caesalpinia. These results suggest a close relationship between root foraging and light capture, where the benefit of the exploitation of the patch will be reflected in whole-plant benefit, if enough light is captured above-ground. In addition, the results suggest a change in the expected plant responses to light due to heterogeneity in soil nutrients, even though the fertilized patch was only a small proportion of the total soil volume. Leaf characteristics such as specific leaf area responded only to light conditions and not to patchily distributed nutrients. Root characteristics responded more strongly to nutrient heterogeneity. Competition modified the pattern of foraging under both high- and low-light conditions in Heliocarpus by 50 days, and the ability to forage for a fertilized patch under LL after 100 days of growth for Caesalpinia. Even though plant growth and productivity are greatly reduced under low-light conditions (HL and LL), competition modifies the ability of species to forage for a rich patch (especially for the fast-growing species Heliocarpus).
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2017-06-16
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , isiRev
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 1983-10-01
    Description: Root elongation of greenhouse-grown Alaskan taiga tree seedlings increased with increasing root temperature in all six species examined and was most temperature sensitive in warm-adapted aspen (Populustremuloides Michx.). Root elongation was slower in fine than large roots and in black spruce (Piceamariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) was less temperature sensitive in fine than in large roots. Root elongation in the laboratory was slowest in black spruce, which has an inherently slow growth rate, and most rapid in poplar (Populusbalsamifera L.) and aspen, which grow more rapidly. In contrast, field root elongation rates tended to be highest in black spruce from cold wet sites, suggesting that site factors other than soil temperature (e.g., moisture) predominated over genetic differences among species in determining field root elongation rates. The seasonal pattern of root elongation was closely correlated with soil temperature and reached maximum rates in July for all tree species (except aspen medium-sized roots). Most roots of each species were in the top 20 cm of soil. However, root growth penetrated to greater depth in warm compared with cold sites. Root biomass in a 130-year black spruce forest (1230 g/m2) comprised only 15% of total tree biomass. Root biomass of 25-year aspen and 60-year poplar sites (517 and 5385 g/m2, respectively) comprised a greater proportion (57% in poplar) of total tree biomass than in spruce.
    Print ISSN: 0045-5067
    Electronic ISSN: 1208-6037
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 1993-05-01
    Description: Seedlings of Alaskan floodplain species (Populusbalsamifera L. (balsam poplar), Alnustenuifolia Nutt. (thinleaf alder), and Piceaglauca (Moench) Voss (white spruce)) and an upland species (Populustremuloides Michx. (trembling aspen)) were grown in early-successional floodplain soils treated with a floodplain salt (calcium sulfate, CaSO4), an osmoticant (polyethylene glycol), and nitrogen. CaSO4 reduced the growth of aspen relative to controls but also reduced the growth of some typical floodplain colonizers (alder at low nitrogen and poplar at high nitrogen). Aspen and poplar were the most rapidly growing species, even when grown with salt or polyethylene glycol. Effects of CaSO4 on growth, therefore, do not explain why aspen is less abundant on the floodplain than are typical floodplain colonizers. CaSO4 reduced growth directly in salt-sensitive species, judging from the insensitivity of water potential, transpiration, and photosynthesis to CaSO4 addition. Tissue concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus were unaffected by CaSO4, suggesting that the declines in nutrient accumulation by salt-sensitive species in response to CaSO4 addition reflected a decline in nutrient demands for growth rather than being the cause of the reduction in growth. Growth and nutrient accumulation were stimulated by nitrogen addition in all species. We suggest that floodplain salts may be important in succession by slowing the establishment and growth of alder, which is responsible for most of the nitrogen acquired by plants during succession.
    Print ISSN: 0045-5067
    Electronic ISSN: 1208-6037
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 1983-12-01
    Description: Seedlings of six Alaskan taiga tree species and one tall shrub were grown in sand at three phosphate levels. There was a positive correlation between the growth rate of a species at the high-phosphate level in sand culture and its productivity in the natural environment. Poplar (Populusbalsamifera L.), which had highest growth rate under high phosphate, was most sensitive to reduction in phosphate supply, followed by birch (Betulapapyrifera (Reg.) Fern, and Raup) and aspen (Populustremuloides Michx.), whereas growth of conifers (larch (Larixlaricina (Du Roi) K. Koch), white spruce (Piceaglauca (Moench) Voss), and black spruce (P. mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.)) from late successional sites was slow and unaffected by phosphate supply. Similarly, when birch and white spruce seedlings were transplanted into natural forest stands, the maximum growth rate of birch was greater than that of white spruce, but birch growth was curtailed more by unfavorable conditions than was that of white spruce. We conclude that a slow growth rate reduces nutrient requirement and therefore minimizes nutrient stress on infertile sites, whereas a rapid growth enables nutrient-demanding species to dominate fertile sites.
    Print ISSN: 0045-5067
    Electronic ISSN: 1208-6037
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
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