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  • 1
    ISSN: 1365-3059
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
    Notes: Sweet potato virus disease (SPVD) is the name used to describe a range of severe symptoms in different cultivars of sweet potato, comprising overall plant stunting combined with leaf narrowing and distortion, and chlorosis, mosaic or vein-clearing. Affected plants of various cultivars were collected from several regions of Uganda. All samples contained the aphid-borne sweet potato feathery mottle potyvirus (SPFMV) and almost all contained the whitefly-borne sweet potato chlorotic stunt closterovirus (SPCSV). SPCSV was detected by a mix of monoclonal antibodies (MAb) previously shown to react only to a Kenyan isolate of SPCSV, but not by a mixture of MAb that detected SPCSV isolates from Nigeria and other countries. Sweet potato chlorotic fleck virus (SPCFV) and sweet potato mild mottle ipomovirus (SPMMV) were seldom detected in SPVD-affected plants, while sweet potato latent virus (SPLV) was never detected. Isolates of SPFMV and SPCSV obtained by insect transmissions together induced typical symptoms of SPVD when graft-inoculated to virus-free sweet potato. SPCSV alone caused stunting and either purpling or yellowing of middle and lower leaves when graft-inoculated to virus-free plants of two cultivars. Similarly diseased naturally inoculated field plants were shown consistently to contain SPCSV. Both this disease and SPVD spread rapidly in a sweet potato crop.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1439-0523
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
    Notes: Sixteen sweet potato varieties were evaluated for fresh storage root yield in 20 trials during 2000–2001 for three seasons in four locations in Uganda. Of the 16 varieties, 11 were developed by farmers and five by a central breeding programme. The behaviour of the varieties was quantified in terms of wide adaptation (genotypic mean across trials), specific adaptation (genotypic predictions for specific locations) and stability (Shukla stability variance). With respect to all three aspects of yield behaviour, farmer varieties performed on average better than the official varieties. The results illustrate the potential that farmer varieties can have in the improvement of sweet potato in Uganda and other regions where high diversity of sweet potato landraces exists.
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1573-5060
    Keywords: Zea mays ; maize ; sweet corn ; vegetable breeding ; sorbitol
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
    Notes: Summary Endosperm sugars and sorbitol were determined on 18 sweet corn (Zea mays L.) populations from a breeding program undertaken to transfer the sugary enhacer (se) gene into diverse sugary (su) backgrounds. Three subpopulations of IL677a, the source of se, and six su Se inbreds were included for comparison. Mature dry kernels of between two and four successive generations of these populations were analyzed. Immature kernels at two developmental stages (21 and 35 days after pollination) were also analyzed for one generation. Eleven of the breeding populations closely resemble IL677a, with high sucrose at the edible stage (21 days after pollination) and maltose accumulating as the seeds matured. In most instances, the distinctive sugar profiles were observed consistently in dry seeds of various generations. Hence, it appears that the se trait can be transferred successfully into su cultivars having various genetic backgrounds. The remaining seven breeding populations possessed elevated sucrose and glucose compared to most of the standard su Se inbreds, but maltose did not accumulate during seed maturation. It is not clear whether se was transferred to these populations and its expression modified or whether another trait was responsible. There were also marked differences in glucose levels among the su Se populations examined.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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