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  • 1
    Call number: AWI A4-95-0010
    In: Antarctic research series, Vol. 61
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: XIV, 207 S. : Ill., graph. Darst. + 1 Disk.
    ISBN: 087590839X
    Series Statement: Antarctic research series 61
    Language: English
    Note: CONTENTS: The Antarctic Research Series: Statement of Objectives / Board of Associate Editors. - Preface / David H. Bromwich and Charles R. Stearns. - Monthly Mean Climatic Data for Antarctic Automatic Weather Stations / Charles R. Stearns, Linda M. Keller, George A. Weidner, and Manuela Sievers. - Katabatic Winds in Adélie Coast / Gerd Wendler, Jean Claude Andre, Paul Pettre, loan Gosink, and Thomas Parish. - Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of the Intense Katabatic Winds at Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica / David H. Bromwich, Thomas R. Parish, Andrea Pellegrini, Charles R. Stearns, and George A. Weidner. - Katabatic Winds Along the Transantarctic Mountains / Christopher J. Breckenridge, Uwe Radok, Charles R. Stearns, and David H. Bromwich. - Satellite and Automatic Weather Station Analyses of Katabatic Surges Across the Ross Ice Shelf / Jorge F. Carrasco and David H. Bromwich. - Sensible and Latent Heat Flux Estimates in Antarctica / Charles R. Stearns and George A. Weidner. - The Kernlose Winter in Adélie Coast / Gerd Wendler and Yuji Kodama. - Antarctic Climate Anomalies Surrounding the Minimum in the Southern Oscillation Index / Shawn R. Smith and Charles R. Stearns. - Variation in Aerosol Concentration Associated With a Polar Climatic Iteration / A. Hogan, D. Riley, B. B. Murphey, S. C. Barnard, and J. A. Samson. - Continuous Nanoclimate Data (1985-1988) From the Ross Desert (McMurdo Dry Valleys) Cryptoendolithic Microbial Ecosystem / Christopher P. McKay, lames A. Nienow, Michael A. Meyer, and E. lmre Friedmann.
    Location: AWI Reading room
    Branch Library: AWI Library
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  • 2
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Fountain, Andrew G; Nylen, Thomas H; Monaghan, Andrew J; Basagic, Hassan J; Bromwich, David H (2010): Snow in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. International Journal of Climatology, 30(5), 633-642, https://doi.org/10.1002/joc.1933
    Publication Date: 2018-09-27
    Description: Snowfall was measured at 11 sites in the McMurdo Dry Valleys to determine its magnitude, its temporal changes, and spatial patterns. Annual values ranged from 3 to 50 mm water equivalent with the highest values nearest the coast and decreasing inland. A particularly strong spatial gradient exists in Taylor Valley, probably resulting from local uplift conditions at the coastal margin and valley topography that limits migration inland. More snow occurs in winter near the coast, whereas inland no seasonal pattern is discernable. This may be due, again, to local uplift conditions, which are common in winter. We find no influence of the distance to the sea ice edge. Katabatic winds play an important role in transporting snow to the valley bottoms and essentially double the precipitation. That much of the snow accumulation sublimates prior to making a hydrologic contribution underscores the notion that the McMurdo Dry Valleys are indeed an extreme polar desert.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 144 data points
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  • 3
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Speirs, Johanna C; Steinhoff, Daniel F; McGowan, Hamish A; Bromwich, David H; Monaghan, Andrew J (2010): Foehn Winds in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica: The Origin of Extreme Warming Events. Journal of Climate, 23(13), 3577-3598, https://doi.org/10.1175/2010JCLI3382.1
    Publication Date: 2018-09-27
    Description: Foehn winds resulting from topographic modification of airflow in the lee of mountain barriers are frequently experienced in the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDVs) of Antarctica. Strong foehn winds in the MDVs cause dramatic warming at onset and have significant effects on landscape forming processes; however, no detailed scientific investigation of foehn in the MDVs has been conducted. As a result, they are often misinterpreted as adiabatically warmed katabatic winds draining from the polar plateau. Herein observations from surface weather stations and numerical model output from the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS) during foehn events in the MDVs are presented. Results show that foehn winds in the MDVs are caused by topographic modification of south-southwesterly airflow, which is channeled into the valleys from higher levels. Modeling of a winter foehn event identifies mountain wave activity similar to that associated with midlatitude foehn winds. These events are found to be caused by strong pressure gradients over the mountain ranges of the MDVs related to synoptic-scale cyclones positioned off the coast of Marie Byrd Land. Analysis of meteorological records for 2006 and 2007 finds an increase of 10% in the frequency of foehn events in 2007 compared to 2006, which corresponds to stronger pressure gradients in the Ross Sea region. It is postulated that the intra- and interannual frequency and intensity of foehn events in the MDVs may therefore vary in response to the position and frequency of cyclones in the Ross Sea region.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 82 data points
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-07-01
    Description: Mission statement: “Promote cooperative international research enabling development of improved weather and environmental prediction services for the polar regions, on time scales from hours to seasonal”. Increased economic, transportation and research activities in polar regions are leading to more demands for sustained and improved availability of predictive weather and climate information to support decision-making. However, partly as a result of a strong emphasis of previous international efforts on lower and middle latitudes, many gaps in weather, sub-seasonal and seasonal forecasting in polar regions hamper reliable decision making in the Arctic, Antarctic and possibly the middle latitudes as well. In order to advance polar prediction capabilities, the WWRP Polar Prediction Project (PPP) has been established as one of three THORPEX (THe Observing System Research and Predictability EXperiment) legacy activities. The aim of PPP, a ten year endeavour (2013-2022), is to promote cooperative international research enabling development of improved weather and environmental prediction services for the polar regions, on hourly to seasonal time scales. In order to achieve its goals, PPP will enhance international and interdisciplinary collaboration through the development of strong linkages with related initiatives; strengthen linkages between academia, research institutions and operational forecasting centres; promote interactions and communication between research and stakeholders; and foster education and outreach. Flagship research activities of PPP include sea ice prediction, polar-lower latitude linkages and the Year of Polar Prediction (YOPP) - an intensive observational, coupled modelling, service-oriented research and educational effort in the period mid-2017 to mid-2019.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Inbook , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 301 (1983), S. 145-147 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] Although it is widely known that long-term climatic information is recorded in the world's ice caps by the oxygen isotopic composition of past precipitation, relatively little effort has been devoted to understanding the atmospheric input signal. Koer-ner5 demonstrated that 18O values from the ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 343 (1990), S. 627-629 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] TABLE 1 Annual zonal averages of meridional moisture transport and its convergence Transport (kg rrT Convergence (kg m 2 yr [P-E] Latitude Latitude °S PO HR Belt°S PO HR BR 50 -17 -10.5 50-60 290 160 452 60 -10 -6.7 60-70 270 133 322 70 -3 -3.7 70-80 90 97 183 ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 328 (1987), S. 51-54 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] Observational and theoretical studies of gravity-driven slope flows (katabatic winds) are numerous. Ball8 points out that the magnitude of terrain-induced pressure gradient is directly pro-portional to both the steepness of the terrain and the strength of the temperature inversion in the lower ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
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    American Meteorological Society
    In:  Journal of Climate, 30 (22). pp. 8913-8927.
    Publication Date: 2019-02-01
    Description: The regional climate model COSMOin Climate Limited-AreaMode (COSMO-CLM or CCLM) is used with a high resolution of 15km for the entire Arctic for all winters 2002/03–2014/15. The simulations show a high spatial and temporal variability of the recent 2-m air temperature increase in the Arctic. The maximum warming occurs north of Novaya Zemlya in the Kara Sea and Barents Sea between March 2003 and 2012 and is responsible for up to a 208C increase. Land-based observations confirm the increase but do not cover the maximum regions that are located over the ocean and sea ice.Also, the 30-km version of theArctic SystemReanalysis (ASR) is used to verify the CCLM for the overlapping time period 2002/03–2011/12. The differences between CCLM and ASR 2-m air temperatures vary slightly within 18C for the ocean and sea ice area. Thus,ASR captures the extreme warming as well. The monthly 2-m air temperatures of observations and ERA-Interim data show a large variability for the winters 1979–2016. Nevertheless, the air temperature rise since the beginning of the twenty-first century is up to 8 times higher than in the decades before. The sea ice decrease is identified as the likely reason for the warming. The vertical temperature profiles show that the warming has a maximum near the surface, but a 0.58Cyr21 increase is found up to 2 km. CCLM, ASR, and also the coarser resolved ERA-Interim data show that February and March are the months with the highest 2-m air temperature increases, averaged over the ocean and sea ice area north of 708N; for CCLM the warming amounts to an average of almost 58C for 2002/03–2011/12.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2017-01-27
    Description: The Year of Polar Prediction (YOPP) has the mission to enable a significant improvement in environmental prediction capabilities for the polar regions and beyond, by coordinating a period of intensive observing, modelling, prediction, verification, user- engagement and education activities. The YOPP Core Phase will be from mid-2017 to mid-2019, flanked by a Preparation Phase and a Consolidation Phase. YOPP is a key component of the World Meteorological Organization – World Weather Research Programme (WMO-WWRP) Polar Prediction Project (PPP). The objectives of YOPP are to: 1. Improve the existing polar observing system (better coverage, higher-quality observations); 2. Gather additional observations through field programmes aimed at improving understanding of key polar processes; 3. Develop improved representation of key polar processes in coupled (and uncoupled) models used for prediction; 4. Develop improved (coupled) data assimilation systems accounting for challenges in the polar regions such as sparseness of observational data; 5. Explore the predictability of the atmosphere-cryosphere-ocean system, with a focus on sea ice, on time scales from days to seasons; 6. Improve understanding of linkages between polar regions and lower latitudes and assess skill of models representing these linkages; 7. Improve verification of polar weather and environmental predictions to obtain better quantitative knowledge on model performance, and on the skill, especially for user-relevant parameters; 8. Demonstrate the benefits of using predictive information for a spectrum of user types and services; 9. Provide training opportunities to generate a sound knowledge base (and its transfer across generations) on polar prediction related issues. The PPP Steering Group provides endorsement for projects that contribute to YOPP to enhance coordination, visibility, communication, and networking. This White Paper is based largely on the much more comprehensive YOPP Implementation Plan (WWRP/PPP No. 3 – 2014), but has an emphasis on Arctic observations.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2016-02-02
    Description: The polar regions have been attracting more and more attention in recent years, fuelled by the perceptible impacts of anthropogenic climate change. Polar climate change provides new opportunities, such as shorter shipping routes between Europe and East Asia, but also new risks such as the potential for industrial accidents or emergencies in ice-covered seas. Here, it is argued that environmental prediction systems for the polar regions are less developed than elsewhere. There are many reasons for this situation, including the polar regions being (historically) lower priority, with less in situ observations, and with numerous local physical processes that are less well-represented by models. By contrasting the relative importance of different physical processes in polar and lower latitudes, the need for a dedicated polar prediction effort is illustrated. Research priorities are identified that will help to advance environmental polar prediction capabilities. Examples include an improvement of the polar observing system; the use of coupled atmosphere-sea ice-ocean models, even for short-term prediction; and insight into polar-lower latitude linkages and their role for forecasting. Given the enormity of some of the challenges ahead, in a harsh and remote environment such as the polar regions, it is argued that rapid progress will only be possible with a coordinated international effort. More specifically, it is proposed to hold a Year of Polar Prediction (YOPP) from mid-2017 to mid-2019 in which the international research and operational forecasting community will work together with stakeholders in a period of intensive observing, modelling, prediction, verification, user-engagement and educational activities.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
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