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  • 1
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    In:  [Talk] In: 20. International Conference on Aquatic Invasive Species, 22.-26.10.2017, Marriott Coral Springs Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA .
    Publication Date: 2017-12-21
    Type: Conference or Workshop Item , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 2
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    In:  [Talk] In: ASLO Aquatic Sciences Meeting 2017, 26.02.-03.03.2017, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA .
    Publication Date: 2017-12-21
    Type: Conference or Workshop Item , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2019-02-01
    Description: Climate change will not only shift environmental means but will also increase the intensity of extreme events, exerting additional stress on ecosystems. While field observations on the ecological consequences of heat waves are emerging, experimental evidence is rare, and lacking at the community level. Using a novel "near-natural" outdoor mesocosms approach, this study tested whether marine summer heat waves have detrimental consequences for macrofauna of a temperate coastal community, and whether sequential heat waves provoke an increase or decrease of sensitivity to thermal stress. Three treatments were applied, defined and characterized through a statistical analysis of 15 years of temperature records from the experimental site: (1) no heat wave, (2) two heat waves in June and July followed by a summer heat wave in August and (3) the summer heat wave only. Overall, 50% of the species showed positive, negative or positive/negative responses in either abundance and/or biomass. We highlight four possible ways in which single species responded to either three subsequent heat waves or one summer heat wave: (1) absence of a response (tolerance, 50% of species), (2) negative accumulative effects by three subsequent heat waves (tellinid bivalve), (3) buffering by proceeding heat waves due to acclimation and/or shifts in phenology (spionid polychaete) and (4) an accumulative positive effect by subsequent heat waves (amphipod). The differential responses to single or sequential heat waves at the species level entailed shifts at the community level. Community-level differences between single and triple heat waves were more pronounced than those between regimes with vs. without heat waves. Detritivory was reduced by the single heat wave while suspension feeding was less common in the triple heat wave regime. Critical extreme events occur already today and will occur more frequently in a changing climate, thus, leading to detrimental impacts on coastal marine systems.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
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  • 4
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Casties, Isabel; Clemmesen, Catriona; Briski, Elizabeta (2019): Environmental tolerance of three gammarid species with and without invasion record under current and future global warming scenarios. Diversity and Distributions, 25(4), 603-612, https://doi.org/10.1111/ddi.12856
    Publication Date: 2019-04-30
    Description: To determine environmental tolerance of native species and related NIS under current and future global warming scenarios of the Baltic Sea, we conducted common garden experiments to test temperature tolerance of three euryhaline gammarid species: one Baltic (Gammarus oceanicus), one Ponto‐Caspian (Pontogammarus maeoticus) and one North American species (Gammarus tigrinus) in two different salinities.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 7722 data points
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  • 5
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Pauli, Nora-Charlotte; Briski, Elizabeta (2018): Euryhalinity of Ponto-Caspian invaders in their native and introduced regions. Aquatic Invasions, 13(4), 439-447, https://doi.org/10.3391/ai.2018.13.4.02
    Publication Date: 2019-04-30
    Description: In the past decades, Ponto-Caspian species established in freshwater and brackish habitats of the North and Baltic Sea and Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River region in much higher numbers than expected based on introduction effort (i.e. shipping frequency) and environmental conditions between these regions. Several studies suggested that Ponto-Caspian taxa are euryhaline and might be able to adapt rapidly to changing salinity conditions, and therefore might be more successful colonizers than species from other regions. To determine the realized niche in the native and introduced habitats of Ponto-Caspian invaders and to assess whether they expanded their salinity tolerance during the invasion process, we conducted a literature search to assess the salinity ranges of 55 Ponto-Caspian species in their native and introduced region. Our results confirmed that the majority of those species occupied a wide range of salinity in their native and introduced habitats. Approximately 50 % of the species were reported from both freshwater and brackish habitats (0-18 PSU) in their native region, occupying a salinity range of at least 10 PSU difference. In general, the number of species tended to decline as salinity increased in both native and introduced habitats. More than 90 % of the Ponto-Caspian invaders occupied freshwater (0-0.5 PSU) habitats, while 18 % did not occur above 18 PSU. Due to the limitation of our dataset, we were not able to confirm shifts in salinity tolerance during the invasion process. However, as our results suggest that the majority of the Ponto-Caspian invaders occupy freshwater and brackish habitats in their native region, the recent numerous invasions of freshwater and brackish areas by those species should not be a surprise. Therefore, managers and policy makers should take into account that the majority of Ponto-Caspian invaders originate from fresh water or low salinities and develop new regulations to prevent future invasions from the Ponto-Caspian region, as well as from areas highly invaded by Ponto-Caspian taxa such as Northern Europe.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/octet-stream, 54.0 kBytes
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  • 6
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Casties, Isabel; Seebens, Hanno; Briski, Elizabeta (2016): Importance of geographic origin for invasion success: A case study of the North and Baltic Seas versus the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River region. Ecology and Evolution, 6(22), 8318-8329, https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2528
    Publication Date: 2019-04-30
    Description: List of non-indigenous species (NIS) established in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River region and the North and Baltic Seas region, their geographic origin, and taxonomic assignment. Asterisks mark the NIS that occur in both the North and Baltic Seas and the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River regions. GL, SL, NW, NE, SW and SE denote the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence River, north-west, north-east, south-west, and south-east, respectively. Eurasia represents inland freshwaters except Yangtze River, Indo-Pacific represents Indian Ocean and the archipelago of Indonesia, Malaysia, and Pilipinas, North America (N America) represents inland freshwaters except the Laurentian Great Lakes, St. Lawrence and Mississippi Rivers, while Australia, New Zealand, Africa and South America (S America) cover all inland freshwaters in these areas.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet, 56.0 kBytes
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  • 7
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Briski, Elizabeta; Ghabooli, Sara; Bailey, Sarah A; MacIsaac, Hugh (2016): Are genetic databases sufficiently populated to detect non-indigenous species? Biological Invasions, 18(7), 1911-1922, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-016-1134-1
    Publication Date: 2019-04-30
    Description: Correct species identifications are of tremendous importance for invasion ecology, as mistakes could lead to misdirecting limited resources against harmless species or inaction against problematic ones. DNA barcoding is becoming a promising and reliable tool for species identifications, however the efficacy of such molecular taxonomy depends on gene region(s) that provide a unique sequence to differentiate among species and on availability of reference sequences in existing genetic databases. Here, we assembled a list of aquatic and terrestrial non-indigenous species (NIS) and checked two leading genetic databases for corresponding sequences of six genome regions used for DNA barcoding. The genetic databases were checked in 2010, 2012, and 2016. All four aquatic kingdoms (Animalia, Chromista, Plantae and Protozoa) were initially equally represented in the genetic databases, with 64, 65, 69, and 61% of NIS included, respectively. Sequences for terrestrial NIS were present at rates of 58 and 78% for Animalia and Plantae, respectively. Six years later, the number of sequences for aquatic NIS increased to 75, 75, 74, and 63% respectively, while those for terrestrial NIS increased to 74 and 88% respectively. Genetic databases are marginally better populated with sequences of terrestrial NIS of plants compared to aquatic NIS and terrestrial NIS of animals. The rate at which sequences are added to databases is not equal among taxa. Though some groups of NIS are not detectable at all based on available data - mostly aquatic ones - encouragingly, current availability of sequences of taxa with environmental and/or economic impact is relatively good and continues to increase with time.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/octet-stream, 811.0 kBytes
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2019-05-10
    Description: The number of released individuals, which is a component of propagule pressure, is considered to be a major driver for the establishment success of non-native species. However, propagule pressure is often assumed to result from single or few release events, which does not necessarily apply to the frequent releases of invertebrates or other taxa through global transport. For instance, the high intensity of global shipping may result in frequent releases of large numbers of individuals, and the complexity of shipping dynamics impedes predictions of invasion dynamics. Here, we present a mathematical model for the spread of planktonic organisms by global shipping, using the history of movements by 33 566 ships among 1477 ports to simulate population dynamics for the comb jelly Mnemiopsis leidyi as a case study. The degree of propagule pressure at one site resulted from the coincident arrival of individuals from other sites with native or non-native populations. Key to sequential spread in European waters was a readily available source of propagules and a suitable recipient environment. These propagules were derived from previously introduced ‘bridgehead’ populations supplemented with those from native sources. Invasion success is therefore determined by the complex interaction of global shipping and local population dynamics. The general findings probably hold true for the spread of species in other complex systems, such as insects or plant seeds exchanged via commercial trade or transport.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2016-09-17
    Description: List of non-indigenous species (NIS) established in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River region and the North and Baltic Seas region, their geographic origin, and taxonomic assignment. Asterisks mark the NIS that occur in both the North and Baltic Seas and the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River regions. GL, SL, NW, NE, SW and SE denote the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence River, north-west, north-east, south-west, and south-east, respectively. Eurasia represents inland freshwaters except Yangtze River, Indo-Pacific represents Indian Ocean and the archipelago of Indonesia, Malaysia, and Pilipinas, North America (N America) represents inland freshwaters except the Laurentian Great Lakes, St. Lawrence and Mississippi Rivers, while Australia, New Zealand, Africa and South America (S America) cover all inland freshwaters in these areas.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: PANGAEA Documentation , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2014-08-08
    Description: The goal of this study was to test whether it is possible to produce early hatching cysts of Artemia franciscana from San Francisco Bay (SFB) by truncation selection. The starting material was an SFB cyst sample, harvested in nature. After selection of early hatching nauplii had taken place, these selected individuals were cultured to maturity, and the hatching rate of their offspring (F1) was compared with that of the parental generation and with the non-selected control F1. The possible differences in hatching rate were used to estimate heritability. Two different selection experiments were run, accompanied with a number of additional tests studying the influence of the hatching set-up, the hatching temperature and diapause termination using hydrogen peroxide, on the hatching rate. Also the influence of different culture salinities on hatching rate and on possible success of selection was studied. The results revealed an influence of all those abiotic factors on the hatching rate, but also a marked interference of the hatching percentage with the hatching rate. Choosing the individuals based on their own phenotypic values (hatching within a certain time span of hatching incubation) and using those to produce the next generation, revealed a positive response. The selection in different salinities showed a different response. Depending on the strength of the selection pressure, the samples were advanced in time, starting with the highest selection pressure, and ending with the control and the parental sample. In spite of the strong interference of environmental factors, our results suggest that selection of early hatching cysts is possible.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
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