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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2016-09-22
    Description: This paper studies the first large scale effort by the Brazilian government to increase the social security compliance of self-employed workers using behavioral interventions. In 2014, the Brazilian Ministry of Social Security gradually delivered by postal mail a booklet reminding nearly 3 million self-employed workers their obligation to contribute to social security. We find that, sending the booklet increased payments by 15 percent and compliance rates by 7 percentage points. This increase is concentrated around the month the booklet was delivered and disappears three months after the intervention, a pattern known as action and backsliding. The relatively brief increase in payments outweighs the cost of sending the booklet by at least a factor of 2. Our results suggest that active behavioral interventions could be used as policy instruments that are orders of magnitude more cost-effective than subsides to increase social security contributions in developing countries, particularly for the self-employed.
    Keywords: D03 ; H26 ; H55 ; O17 ; ddc:330 ; Behavioral interventions ; Tax evasion ; Informal Sector ; Social Security and Pensions
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:workingPaper
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-02-06
    Description: We study the impact of welfare payments in Ecuador on the probability that women and men work, and on whether they are employed in the formal or informal sectors. Our analysis is based on two distinct identification strategies and two separate sources of data spanning more than 10 years. We find no evidence that welfare discouraged work. However, among women, welfare payments led to reductions in social security contributions (which are mandated for salaried workers) and payment of VAT and income taxes (which are mandated for the self-employed and firm owners), although the magnitude of these effects is small.
    Keywords: H55 ; I38 ; J22 ; ddc:330 ; welfare ; work ; formality
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:workingPaper
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  • 3
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    Washington, DC: Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)
    Publication Date: 2018-02-06
    Description: Many poor households in developing countries are liquidity-constrained. As a result, they may under-invest in the human capital of their children. We provide new evidence on the long-term (10-year) effects of cash transfers using data from Ecuador. Our analysis is based on two separate sources of data and two identification strategies. First, we extend the results from an experiment that randomly assigned children under the age of 6 years to early or late treatment groups. Although the early treatment group received twice as much in total transfers, we find no difference between children in the two groups on performance on a large number of tests. Second, we use a regression discontinuity design exploiting the fact that a poverty index was used to determine eligibility for transfers. We focus on children who were just-eligible and just-ineligible for transfers when they were in late childhood, and compare their school attainment and work status 10 years later. Transfers increased secondary school completion, but the effects are small, between 1 and 2 percentage points from a counterfactual school completion rate of 75 percent. We conclude that any effect of cash transfers on the inter-generational transmission of poverty in Ecuador is likely to be modest.
    Keywords: I38 ; ddc:330 ; Conditional cash transfers (CCTs) ; poverty-traps ; long-term impacts ; Ecuador ; Bono de Desarrollo Humano ; Familienleistungsausgleich ; Wirkungsanalyse ; Kinder ; Bildungsverhalten ; Ecuador
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:workingPaper
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-02-06
    Description: Muchos hogares pobres en los países en desarrollo enfrentan problemas de liquidez. Como resultado, es probable que inviertan menos de lo necesario en el capital humano de sus niños. Utilizando datos de Ecuador, proporcionamos nueva evidencia sobre los efectos de largo plazo (10 años) de las transferencias monetarias. Nuestro análisis se basa en dos fuentes de datos diferentes y en dos estrategias de identificación. Primero, extendemos los resultados de un experimento que asignó aleatoriamente niños menores de 6 años a grupos de tratamiento “temprano” o “tardío”. Aunque el grupo de tratamiento temprano recibió el doble de transferencias totales, no enconramos diferencias entre los niños de ambos grupos en términos de su rendimiento en una variedad de pruebas. Segundo, utilizamos un diseño de regression discontinua aprovechando el uso de un “índice de pobreza” para determinar la elegibilidad para las transferencias. Nos enfocamos en niños que se encontraban justo por encima y justo por debajo del umbral de elegibilidad cuando estaban al final de la infancia y comparamos su rendimiento escolar y su estatus laboral 10 años más tarde. Las transferencias aumentaron la finalización de la escuela secundaria, pero los efectos son pequeños: entre 1 y 2 puntos porcentuales de una tasa contrafactual de finalización escolar del 75 por ciento. Concluimos que cualquier efecto de las transferencias monetarias en la transmisión intergeneracional de la pobreza en Ecuador será apenas modesto.
    Description: Many poor households in developing countries are liquidity-constrained. As a result, they may under-invest in the human capital of their children. We provide new evidence on the long-term (10-year) effects of cash transfers using data from Ecuador. Our analysis is based on two separate sources of data and two identification strategies. First, we extend the results from an experiment that randomly assigned children under the age of 6 years to early or late treatment groups. Although the early treatment group received twice as much in total transfers, we find no difference between children in the two groups on performance on a large number of tests. Second, we use a regression discontinuity design exploiting the fact that a poverty index was used to determine eligibility for transfers. We focus on children who were just-eligible and just-ineligible for transfers when they were in late childhood, and compare their school attainment and work status 10 years later. Transfers increased secondary school completion, but the effects are small, between 1 and 2 percentage points from a counterfactual school completion rate of 75 percent. We conclude that any effect of cash transfers on the inter-generational transmission of poverty in Ecuador is likely to be modest.
    Keywords: I38 ; ddc:330 ; Transferencias monetarias condicionadas ; pobreza ; impactos de largo término ; Ecuador ; Bono de Desarrollo Humano ; Familienleistungsausgleich ; Wirkungsanalyse ; Kinder ; Bildungsverhalten ; Ecuador
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: Spanish
    Type: doc-type:workingPaper
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