ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2019-01-09
    Description: Highlights • Continental margin-scale spatial variability in C values among grain size fractions is presented. • Two different hydrodynamic modes influencing in 14C heterogeneity are identified. • A new index (H14 index) is defined to describe overall 14C heterogeneity within marine surface sedimentary OC. Abstract The deposition and long-term burial of sedimentary organic matter (OM) on continental margins comprises a fundamental component of the global carbon cycle. A key unknown in interpretation of carbon isotope records of sedimentary OM is the extent to which OM accumulating in continental shelf and slope sediments is influenced by dispersal and redistribution processes. Here, we present results from an extensive survey of organic carbon (OC) characteristics of grain size fractions (ranging from 〈20 to 250 μm) retrieved from Chinese marginal sea surface sediments in order to assess the extent to which the abundance and isotope composition of OM in shallow shelf seas is influenced by hydrodynamic processes. Our findings show that contrasting relationships exist between 14C contents of OC and grain size in surface sediments associated with two different hydrodynamic modes, suggesting that transport pathways and mechanisms imparted by the different hydrodynamic conditions exert a strong influence on 14C contents of OM in continental shelf sediments. In deeper regions and erosional areas, we infer that bedload transport exerts the strongest influence on (decreases) OC 14C contents of the coarser fraction, while resuspension processes induce OC 14C depletion of intermediate grain size fractions in shallow inner-shelf settings. We use the inter-fraction spread in 14C values, defined here as 14H , to argue that the hydrodynamic processes amplify overall 14C heterogeneity within corresponding bulk sediment samples. The magnitude and footprint of this heterogeneity carries implications for our understanding of carbon cycling in shallow marginal seas.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Coppola, Alysha I; Wiedemeier, Daniel B; Galy, Valier; Haghipour, Negar; Hanke, Ulrich M; Nascimento, Gabriela S; Usman, Muhammed Ojoshogu; Blattmann, Thomas M; Reisser, Moritz; Freymond, Chantal V; Zhao, Meixun; Voss, Britta; Wacker, Lukas; Schefuß, Enno; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Abiven, Samuel; Schmidt, Michael W I; Eglinton, Timothy Ian (2018): Global-scale evidence for the refractory nature of riverine black carbon. Nature Geoscience, 11(8), 584-588, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-018-0159-8
    Publication Date: 2019-05-11
    Description: Wildfires and incomplete combustion of fossil fuel produce large amounts of black carbon. Black carbon production and transport are essential components of the carbon cycle. Constraining estimates of black carbon exported from land to ocean is critical, given ongoing changes in land use and climate, which affect fire occurrence and black carbon dynamics. Here, we present an inventory of the concentration and radiocarbon content (∆14C) of particulate black carbon for 18 rivers around the globe. We find that particulate black carbon accounts for about 15.8 ± 0.9% of river particulate organic carbon, and that fluxes of particulate black carbon co-vary with river-suspended sediment, indicating that particulate black carbon export is primarily controlled by erosion. River particulate black carbon is not exclusively from modern sources but is also aged in intermediate terrestrial carbon pools in several high-latitude rivers, with ages of up to 17,000 14C years. The flux-weighted 14C average age of particulate black carbon exported to oceans is 3,700 ± 400 14C years. We estimate that the annual global flux of particulate black carbon to the ocean is 0.017 to 0.037 Pg, accounting for 4 to 32% of the annually produced black carbon. When buried in marine sediments, particulate black carbon is sequestered to form a long-term sink for CO2.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/octet-stream, 29.0 kBytes
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-06-28
    Description: © The Author(s), 2018. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Biogeosciences 15 (2018): 3357-3375, doi:10.5194/bg-15-3357-2018.
    Description: The modern-day Godavari River transports large amounts of sediment (170 Tg per year) and terrestrial organic carbon (OCterr; 1.5 Tg per year) from peninsular India to the Bay of Bengal. The flux and nature of OCterr is considered to have varied in response to past climate and human forcing. In order to delineate the provenance and nature of organic matter (OM) exported by the fluvial system and establish links to sedimentary records accumulating on its adjacent continental margin, the stable and radiogenic isotopic composition of bulk OC, abundance and distribution of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs), sedimentological properties (e.g. grain size, mineral surface area, etc.) of fluvial (riverbed and riverbank) sediments and soils from the Godavari basin were analysed and these characteristics were compared to those of a sediment core retrieved from the continental slope depocenter. Results show that river sediments from the upper catchment exhibit higher total organic carbon (TOC) contents than those from the lower part of the basin. The general relationship between TOC and sedimentological parameters (i.e. mineral surface area and grain size) of the sediments suggests that sediment mineralogy, largely driven by provenance, plays an important role in the stabilization of OM during transport along the river axis, and in the preservation of OM exported by the Godavari to the Bay of Bengal. The stable carbon isotopic (δ13C) characteristics of river sediments and soils indicate that the upper mainstream and its tributaries drain catchments exhibiting more 13C enriched carbon than the lower stream, resulting from the regional vegetation gradient and/or net balance between the upper (C4-dominated plants) and lower (C3-dominated plants) catchments. The radiocarbon contents of organic carbon (Δ14COC) in deep soils and eroding riverbanks suggests these are likely sources of "old" or pre-aged carbon to the Godavari River that increasingly dominates the late Holocene portion of the offshore sedimentary record. While changes in water flow and sediment transport resulting from recent dam construction have drastically impacted the flux, loci, and composition of OC exported from the modern Godavari basin, complicating reconciliation of modern-day river basin geochemistry with that recorded in continental margin sediments, such investigations provide important insights into climatic and anthropogenic controls on OC cycling and burial.
    Description: This project was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundations (“CAPS LOCK” grant no. 200021-140850 and “CAPS-LOCK2” grant no. 200021-163162). Francien Peterse received funding from NWO-Veni grant (grant no. 863.13.016). Liviu Giosan thanks grants from the National Science Foundation (OCE-0841736) and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Article
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-10-30
    Description: Author Posting. © The Author(s), 2018. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here under a nonexclusive, irrevocable, paid-up, worldwide license granted to WHOI. It is made available for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Nature Geoscience 11 (2018): 584-588, doi:10.1038/s41561-018-0159-8.
    Description: Wildfires and incomplete combustion of fossil fuel produce large amounts of black carbon. Black carbon production and transport are essential components of the carbon cycle. Constraining estimates of black carbon exported from land to ocean is critical, given ongoing changes in land use and climate, which affect fire occurrence and black carbon dynamics. Here, we present an inventory of the concentration and radiocarbon content (∆14C) of particulate black carbon for 18 rivers around the globe. We find that particulate black carbon accounts for about 15.8 ± 0.9% of river particulate organic carbon, and that fluxes of particulate black carbon co-vary with river-suspended sediment, indicating that particulate black carbon export is primarily controlled by erosion. River particulate black carbon is not exclusively from modern sources but is also aged in intermediate terrestrial carbon pools in several high-latitude rivers, with ages of up to 17,000 14C years. The flux-weighted 14C average age of particulate black carbon exported to oceans is 3,700 ± 400 14C years. We estimate that the annual global flux of particulate black carbon to the ocean is 0.017 to 0.037 Pg, accounting for 4 to 32% of the annually produced black carbon. When buried in marine sediments, particulate black carbon is sequestered to form a long-term sink for CO2.
    Description: A.C. acknowledges financial support from the University of Zurich Forschungskredit Fellowship and the University of Zurich (grant No. STWF-18-026). M.R., S.A. and M.S. acknowledge support from the University Research Priority Projection Global Change and Biodiversity (URPP-GCB). M.Z. acknowledges support from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41521064). T.E. acknowledges support from the Swiss National Science Foundation (“CAPS-LOCK” and “CAPS-LOCK2” #200021_140850). V.G. acknowledges financial support from an Independent Study Award from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Preprint
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-05-04
    Description: Coastal oceans play a crucial role in the global carbon cycle, and are increasingly affected by anthropogenic forcing. Understanding carbon cycling in coastal environments is hindered by convoluted sources and myriad processes that vary over a range of spatial and temporal scales. In this study, we deconvolve the complex mosaic of organic carbon manifested in Chinese Marginal Sea (CMS) sediments using a novel numerical clustering algorithm based on 14C and total OC content. Results reveal five regions that encompass geographically distinct depositional settings. Complementary statistical analyses reveal contrasting region-dependent controls on carbon dynamics and composition. Overall, clustering is shown to be highly effective in demarcating areas of distinct organic facies by disentangling intertwined organic geochemical patterns resulting from superimposed effects of OC provenance, reworking and deposition on a shelf region exhibiting pronounced spatial heterogeneity. This information will aid in constraining region-specific budgets of carbon burial and carbon cycle processes. ©2018. The Authors.
    Print ISSN: 0094-8276
    Electronic ISSN: 1944-8007
    Topics: Geosciences , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-02-08
    Description: The modern-day Godavari River transports large amounts of sediment (170 Tg per year) and terrestrial organic carbon (OCterr; 1.5 Tg per year) from peninsular India to the Bay of Bengal. The flux and nature of OCterr is considered to have varied in response to past climate and human forcing. In order to delineate the provenance and nature of organic matter (OM) exported by the fluvial system and establish links to sedimentary records accumulating on its adjacent continental margin, the stable and radiogenic isotopic composition of bulk OC, abundance and distribution of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), sedimentological properties (e.g. grain size, mineral surface area etc.) of fluvial (riverbed and riverbank) sediments and soils from the Godavari basin were analysed and these characteristics were compared to those of a sediment core retrieved from the continental slope depocenter. Results show that river sediments from the upper catchment exhibit higher total organic carbon (TOC) contents than those from the lower part of the basin. The general relationship between TOC and sedimentological parameters (i.e., mineral-specific surface area and grain size) of the sediments suggests that sediment mineralogy, largely driven by provenance, plays an important role in the stabilization of OM during transport along the river axis, and in preservation of OM exported by the Godavari to the Bay of Bengal. The stable carbon isotopic (δ13C) characteristics of river sediments and soils indicate that the upper mainstream and its tributaries drain catchments exhibiting more 13C enriched carbon than the lower stream resulting from the regional vegetation gradient and/or net balance between the upper (C4-dominated plants) and lower (C3-dominated plants) catchments. The radiocarbon contents of organic carbon (Δ14COC) in deep soils and eroding riverbanks suggests these are likely sources of “old” or pre-aged carbon to the Godavari River that increasingly dominates the late Holocene portion of the offshore sedimentary record. Reduced monsoonal rainfall and sediment transport impeded by recent dam constructions have drastically impacted the flux, loci and composition of OC exported from the modern Godavari basin, rendering it challenging to reconcile modern-day river geochemistry with that recorded in continental margin sediments.
    Print ISSN: 1810-6277
    Electronic ISSN: 1810-6285
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-07-09
    Description: Wildfires and incomplete combustion of fossil fuel produce large amounts of black carbon. Black carbon production and transport are essential components of the carbon cycle. Constraining estimates of black carbon exported from land to ocean is critical, given ongoing changes in land use and climate, which affect fire occurrence and black carbon dynamics. Here, we present an inventory of the concentration and radiocarbon content (∆14C) of particulate black carbon for 18 rivers around the globe. We find that particulate black carbon accounts for about 15.8 ± 0.9% of river particulate organic carbon, and that fluxes of particulate black carbon co-vary with river-suspended sediment, indicating that particulate black carbon export is primarily controlled by erosion. River particulate black carbon is not exclusively from modern sources but is also aged in intermediate terrestrial carbon pools in several high-latitude rivers, with ages of up to 17,000 14C years. The flux-weighted 14C average age of particulate black carbon exported to oceans is 3,700 ± 400 14C years. We estimate that the annual global flux of particulate black carbon to the ocean is 0.017 to 0.037 Pg, accounting for 4 to 32% of the annually produced black carbon. When buried in marine sediments, particulate black carbon is sequestered to form a long-term sink for CO2. © 2018, The Author(s).
    Print ISSN: 1752-0894
    Electronic ISSN: 1752-0908
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Springer Nature
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2019-01-01
    Description: Inland waters play a major role in the global carbon cycle, with particulate organic carbon (POC) burial in terrestrial wetlands surpassing that in ocean sediments. Lake Constance, the second largest lake at the periphery of the European Alps, receives POC sourced from both aquatic and terrestrial productivity as well as petrogenic OC (OCpetro) from bedrock erosion. Distinguishing POC inputs to lake sediments is key to assessing carbon flux and fate as reworked OCpetro represents neither a net sink of atmospheric CO2 nor source of O2. New stable and radiocarbon isotopic data indicate that 11 (9–12) Gg/yr of OCpetro is buried in Lake Constance with underlying sediments on average containing 0.3 (0.25–0.33) wt% OCpetro. Extrapolation of these results suggests that 27 TgOCpetro/yr (12–54 TgOC/yr) could be subject to temporary geological storage in lakes globally, which is comparable to estimates of 43−25+61 TgOCpetro/yr delivered to the ocean by rivers (Galy et al., 2015). More studies are needed to quantify OCpetro burial in inland sedimentary reservoirs in order to accurately account for atmospheric carbon sequestration in terrestrial basins.
    Print ISSN: 0009-2541
    Electronic ISSN: 1872-6836
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences
    Published by Elsevier
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2018-10-09
    Description: In the version of this Article originally published, the units of the x and y axes in Fig. 3a were incorrectly given as ‘mg km–2 yr–1’; the correct units are ‘Mg km–2 yr–1’. These errors have now been corrected in the online versions. © 2018, Springer Nature Limited.
    Print ISSN: 1752-0894
    Electronic ISSN: 1752-0908
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Springer Nature
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2019-08-08
    Description: Growing evidence points to the dynamic role that kerogen is playing on the Earth's surface in controlling atmospheric chemistry over geologic time. Although quantitative constraints on weathering of kerogen remain loose, its changing weathering behavior modulated by the activity of glaciers, suggest that this largest pool of reduced carbon on Earth may have played a key part in atmospheric CO2 variability across recent glacial-interglacial times and beyond.
    Print ISSN: 1810-6277
    Electronic ISSN: 1810-6285
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...