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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-10-14
    Description: The comparison of related genomes has emerged as a powerful lens for genome interpretation. Here we report the sequencing and comparative analysis of 29 eutherian genomes. We confirm that at least 5.5% of the human genome has undergone purifying selection, and locate constrained elements covering approximately 4.2% of the genome. We use evolutionary signatures and comparisons with experimental data sets to suggest candidate functions for approximately 60% of constrained bases. These elements reveal a small number of new coding exons, candidate stop codon readthrough events and over 10,000 regions of overlapping synonymous constraint within protein-coding exons. We find 220 candidate RNA structural families, and nearly a million elements overlapping potential promoter, enhancer and insulator regions. We report specific amino acid residues that have undergone positive selection, 280,000 non-coding elements exapted from mobile elements and more than 1,000 primate- and human-accelerated elements. Overlap with disease-associated variants indicates that our findings will be relevant for studies of human biology, health and disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3207357/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3207357/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin -- Garber, Manuel -- Zuk, Or -- Lin, Michael F -- Parker, Brian J -- Washietl, Stefan -- Kheradpour, Pouya -- Ernst, Jason -- Jordan, Gregory -- Mauceli, Evan -- Ward, Lucas D -- Lowe, Craig B -- Holloway, Alisha K -- Clamp, Michele -- Gnerre, Sante -- Alfoldi, Jessica -- Beal, Kathryn -- Chang, Jean -- Clawson, Hiram -- Cuff, James -- Di Palma, Federica -- Fitzgerald, Stephen -- Flicek, Paul -- Guttman, Mitchell -- Hubisz, Melissa J -- Jaffe, David B -- Jungreis, Irwin -- Kent, W James -- Kostka, Dennis -- Lara, Marcia -- Martins, Andre L -- Massingham, Tim -- Moltke, Ida -- Raney, Brian J -- Rasmussen, Matthew D -- Robinson, Jim -- Stark, Alexander -- Vilella, Albert J -- Wen, Jiayu -- Xie, Xiaohui -- Zody, Michael C -- Broad Institute Sequencing Platform and Whole Genome Assembly Team -- Baldwin, Jen -- Bloom, Toby -- Chin, Chee Whye -- Heiman, Dave -- Nicol, Robert -- Nusbaum, Chad -- Young, Sarah -- Wilkinson, Jane -- Worley, Kim C -- Kovar, Christie L -- Muzny, Donna M -- Gibbs, Richard A -- Baylor College of Medicine Human Genome Sequencing Center Sequencing Team -- Cree, Andrew -- Dihn, Huyen H -- Fowler, Gerald -- Jhangiani, Shalili -- Joshi, Vandita -- Lee, Sandra -- Lewis, Lora R -- Nazareth, Lynne V -- Okwuonu, Geoffrey -- Santibanez, Jireh -- Warren, Wesley C -- Mardis, Elaine R -- Weinstock, George M -- Wilson, Richard K -- Genome Institute at Washington University -- Delehaunty, Kim -- Dooling, David -- Fronik, Catrina -- Fulton, Lucinda -- Fulton, Bob -- Graves, Tina -- Minx, Patrick -- Sodergren, Erica -- Birney, Ewan -- Margulies, Elliott H -- Herrero, Javier -- Green, Eric D -- Haussler, David -- Siepel, Adam -- Goldman, Nick -- Pollard, Katherine S -- Pedersen, Jakob S -- Lander, Eric S -- Kellis, Manolis -- 095908/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- GM82901/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG003474/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004037/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003067/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003067-09/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Oct 12;478(7370):476-82. doi: 10.1038/nature10530.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. kersli@broadinstitute.org〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21993624" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Disease ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Exons/genetics ; Genome/*genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Genomics ; Health ; Humans ; Mammals/*genetics ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Phylogeny ; RNA/classification/genetics ; Selection, Genetic/genetics ; Sequence Alignment ; Sequence Analysis, DNA
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-01-16
    Description: Many regulatory mechanisms require a high degree of specificity in protein-DNA binding. Nucleotide sequence does not provide an answer to the question of why a protein binds only to a small subset of the many putative binding sites in the genome that share the same core motif. Whereas higher-order effects, such as chromatin accessibility, cooperativity and cofactors, have been described, DNA shape recently gained attention as another feature that fine-tunes the DNA binding specificities of some transcription factor families. Our G enome B rowser for DNA shape annotations (GBshape; freely available at http://rohslab.cmb.usc.edu/GBshape/ ) provides minor groove width, propeller twist, roll, helix twist and hydroxyl radical cleavage predictions for the entire genomes of 94 organisms. Additional genomes can easily be added using the GBshape framework. GBshape can be used to visualize DNA shape annotations qualitatively in a genome browser track format, and to download quantitative values of DNA shape features as a function of genomic position at nucleotide resolution. As biological applications, we illustrate the periodicity of DNA shape features that are present in nucleosome-occupied sequences from human, fly and worm, and we demonstrate structural similarities between transcription start sites in the genomes of four Drosophila species.
    Print ISSN: 0305-1048
    Electronic ISSN: 1362-4962
    Topics: Biology
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-07-25
    Description: We report a high-resolution time series study of transcriptome dynamics following antimiR-mediated inhibition of miR-9 in a Hodgkin lymphoma cell-line—the first such dynamic study of the microRNA inhibition response—revealing both general and specific aspects of the physiological response. We show miR-9 inhibition inducing a multiphasic transcriptome response, with a direct target perturbation before 4 h, earlier than previously reported, amplified by a downstream peak at ~32 h consistent with an indirect response due to secondary coherent regulation. Predictive modelling indicates a major role for miR-9 in post-transcriptional control of RNA processing and RNA binding protein regulation. Cluster analysis identifies multiple co-regulated gene regulatory modules. Functionally, we observe a shift over time from mRNA processing at early time points to translation at later time points. We validate the key observations with independent time series qPCR and we experimentally validate key predicted miR-9 targets. Methodologically, we developed sensitive functional data analytic predictive methods to analyse the weak response inherent in microRNA inhibition experiments. The methods of this study will be applicable to similar high-resolution time series transcriptome analyses and provides the context for more accurate experimental design and interpretation of future microRNA inhibition studies.
    Print ISSN: 0305-1048
    Electronic ISSN: 1362-4962
    Topics: Biology
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2016-05-20
    Print ISSN: 0305-1048
    Electronic ISSN: 1362-4962
    Topics: Biology
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2012-06-06
    Description: The modified base 5-methylcytosine (m 5 C) is well studied in DNA, but investigations of its prevalence in cellular RNA have been largely confined to tRNA and rRNA. In animals, the two m 5 C methyltransferases NSUN2 and TRDMT1 are known to modify specific tRNAs and have roles in the control of cell growth and differentiation. To map modified cytosine sites across a human transcriptome, we coupled bisulfite conversion of cellular RNA with next-generation sequencing. We confirmed 21 of the 28 previously known m 5 C sites in human tRNAs and identified 234 novel tRNA candidate sites, mostly in anticipated structural positions. Surprisingly, we discovered 10 275 sites in mRNAs and other non-coding RNAs. We observed that distribution of modified cytosines between RNA types was not random; within mRNAs they were enriched in the untranslated regions and near Argonaute binding regions. We also identified five new sites modified by NSUN2, broadening its known substrate range to another tRNA, the RPPH1 subunit of RNase P and two mRNAs. Our data demonstrates the widespread presence of modified cytosines throughout coding and non-coding sequences in a transcriptome, suggesting a broader role of this modification in the post-transcriptional control of cellular RNA function.
    Keywords: Massively Parallel (Deep) Sequencing, Transcriptome Mapping - Monitoring Gene Expression
    Print ISSN: 0305-1048
    Electronic ISSN: 1362-4962
    Topics: Biology
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  • 6
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    The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2019
    Description: 〈p〉Protein phosphorylation is a major regulator of protein function and biological outcomes. This was first recognized through functional biochemical experiments, and in the past decade, major technological advances in mass spectrometry have enabled the study of protein phosphorylation on a global scale. This rapidly growing field of phosphoproteomics has revealed that more than 100,000 distinct phosphorylation events occur in human cells, which likely affect the function of every protein. Phosphoproteomics has improved the understanding of the function of even the most well-characterized protein kinases by revealing new downstream substrates and biology. However, current biochemical and bioinformatic approaches have only identified kinases for less than 5% of the phosphoproteome, and functional assignments of phosphosites are almost negligible. Notably, our understanding of the relationship between kinases and their substrates follows a power law distribution, with almost 90% of phosphorylation sites currently assigned to the top 20% of kinases. In addition, more than 150 kinases do not have a single known substrate. Despite a small group of kinases dominating biomedical research, the number of substrates assigned to a kinase does not correlate with disease relevance as determined by pathogenic human mutation prevalence and mouse model phenotypes. Improving our understanding of the substrates targeted by all kinases and functionally annotating the phosphoproteome will be broadly beneficial. Advances in phosphoproteomics technologies, combined with functional screening approaches, should make it feasible to illuminate the connectivity and functionality of the entire phosphoproteome, providing enormous opportunities for discovering new biology, therapeutic targets, and possibly diagnostics.〈/p〉
    Print ISSN: 1945-0877
    Electronic ISSN: 1937-9145
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
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