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  • 1
    Call number: SR 90.0016(244)
    In: Mitteilungen aus dem Geologischen Institut der Eidgenössischen Technischen Hochschule und der Universität Zürich. N.F.
    Type of Medium: Series available for loan
    Pages: 242 S.
    Series Statement: Mitteilungen aus dem Geologischen Institut der Eidgenössischen Technischen Hochschule und der Universität Zürich N.F., 244
    Language: German
    Location: Lower compact magazine
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
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  • 2
    Call number: M 96.0510
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 431 S.
    ISBN: 3764354720
    Series Statement: Monte Verita
    Classification: D.1.
    Language: German
    Location: Upper compact magazine
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
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  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Rock mechanics and rock engineering 18 (1985), S. 57-58 
    ISSN: 1434-453X
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Architecture, Civil Engineering, Surveying , Geosciences
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: In studies of sensory contributions to motor control, it may be advantageous to temporarily reduce the sensitivity of specific sensory systems. This article details a method for non-invasively inducing cutaneous anesthesia, leaving proprioceptive and motor functions intact. This method, called alternating-pulse iontophoresis, differs from conventional direct-current (DC) iontophoretic drug delivery in that adjacent drug delivery electrodes are stimulated out-of-phase. The total current delivered at any instant is then less than that produced during a comparable DC application, while the uniformity of drug delivery is expected to improve. Effective delivery of local anesthetics to the cutaneous foot soles by alternating-pulse iontophoresis was demonstrated using cutaneous pressure sensory threshold levels (STL's) assessed with Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments (arbitrary units of perceived force, or a.u.). Thirteen of 16 healthy subjects achieved a level of anesthesia greater than or equal to that normally associated with clinical peripheral sensory neuropathy. Average STL's measured prior to the anesthesia procedure were 4.00 a.u. ( approximately 10 mN). Immediately following the procedure, STL's were elevated to an average of 5.40 a.u. ( approximately 246 mN) and averaged 4.97 a.u. ( approximately 92 mN) after 50 min of standing. A number of research and clinical applications for this technique are suggested.
    Keywords: Life Sciences (General)
    Type: Journal of neuroscience methods (ISSN 0165-0270); Volume 125; 1-2; 209-14
    Format: text
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: We compared the mediolateral (M/L) responses to perturbations during locomotion of vestibulopathic (VP) subjects to those of controls. Eight subjects with unilateral vestibular loss (100% Reduced Vestibular Response from the caloric test) resulting from surgery for vestibular schwannoma and 11 controls were selected for this study. Despite their known vestibulopathy, all VP subjects scored within the normal range on computerized dynamic posturography Sensory Organization Tests. During gait, subjects were given surface perturbations of the right support-phase foot in two possible directions (forward-right and backward-left) at two possible magnitudes (5 and 10 cm) that were randomly mixed with trials having no perturbations. M/L stability was quantified by estimating the length of the M/L moment arm between the support foot and the trunk, and the M/L accelerations of the sternum and the head. The VP group had greater changes (p 〈 0.05) in their moment arm responses compared to controls. The number of steps that it took for the moment arm oscillations to return to normal and the variability in the moment arms were greater for the VP group. Differences in the sternum and head accelerations between VP and control groups were not as consistent, but there was a trend toward greater response deviations in the VP group for all 4 perturbation types. Increased response magnitude and variability of the VP group is consistent with an increase in their sensory noise of vestibular inputs due to the surgical lesion. Another possibility is a reduced sensitivity to motion inputs. This perturbation approach may prove useful for characterizing subtle vestibulopathies and similar changes in the human orientation mechanism after exposure to microgravity.
    Keywords: Life Sciences (General)
    Type: Journal of vestibular research : equilibrium & orientation (ISSN 0957-4271); Volume 12; 5-6; 239-53
    Format: text
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2019-05-30
    Description: Low knowledge worker productivity is an important problem that needs to be addressed. Current research addressing this problem is fragmented and deals with different isolated elements of the problem. There is a need for a holistic approach to knowledge worker productivity. This paper takes the first steps of a holistic approach to knowledge worker productivity by using soft systems methodology to describe the problem situation. The main challenge of this research was the abstraction of the results from two literature reviews into simple rich pictures and specific root definitions to identify the fundamentals of knowledge worker productivity. The problem situation was explored from the perspective of two problem owners, the organization and the individual knowledge worker. The rich picture from the perspective of the organization highlighted that the organization must communicate what they perceive as value and create a work environment that promotes collaboration, encourages knowledge sharing, motivates and fulfills the needs of their knowledge workers. The rich picture from the perspective of the individual knowledge worker highlighted the fact that knowledge workers need to manage their personal resources, be effective and efficient to maximize their own productivity. This paper attempts to integrate these two perspectives into a holistic view.
    Keywords: D03 ; D20 ; ddc:330 ; soft systems methodology ; rich picture ; personal resources ; energy management ; organization ; work environment ; knowledge worker productivity ; management ; knowledge management ; retaining knowledge workers
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:article
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2019-07-19
    Description: Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during the initial exposure to microgravity and during the re-adapation phase following a return to an earth-gravitational environment. These alterations may disrupt the ability to perform mission critical functional tasks requiring ambulation, manual control and gaze stability. Interestingly, astronauts who return from space flight show substantial differences in their abilities to readapt to a gravitational environment. The ability to predict the manner and degree to which individual astronauts would be affected would improve the effectiveness of countermeasure training programs designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. For such an approach to succeed, we must develop predictive measures of sensorimotor adaptability that will allow us to foresee, before actual space flight, which crewmembers are likely to experience the greatest challenges to their adaptive capacities. The goals of this project are to identify and characterize this set of predictive measures that include: 1) behavioral tests to assess sensory bias and adaptability quantified using both strategic and plastic-adaptive responses; 2) imaging to determine individual brain morphological and functional features using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging, resting state functional connectivity MRI, and sensorimotor adaptation task-related functional brain activation; 3) genotype markers for genetic polymorphisms in Catechol-O-Methyl Transferase, Dopamine Receptor D2, Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and genetic polymorphism of alpha2-adrenergic receptor that play a role in the neural pathways underlying sensorimotor adaptation. We anticipate these predictive measures will be significantly correlated with individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability after long-duration space flight and an analog bed rest environment. We will be conducting a retrospective study leveraging data already collected from relevant ongoing/completed bed rest and space flight studies. These data will be combined with predictor metrics that will be collected prospectively - behavioral, brain imaging and genomic measures; from these returning subjects to build models for predicting post-mission (bed rest - non-astronauts or space flight - astronauts) adaptive capability as manifested in their outcome measures. Comparisons of model performance will allow us to better design and implement sensorimotor adaptability training countermeasures that are customized for each crewmember's sensory biases, adaptive capacity, brain structure and functional capacities, and genetic predispositions against decrements in post-mission adaptive capability. This ability will allow more efficient use of crew time during training and will optimize training prescriptions for astronauts to ensure expected outcomes.
    Keywords: Aerospace Medicine
    Type: JSC-CN-32148 , 2015 Human Research Program Investigators'' Workshop; 13-15 Jan. 2015; Galveston, TX; United States
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2019-07-19
    Description: Astronauts returning from space flight show significant inter-subject variations in their abilities to readapt to a gravitational environment because of their innate sensory weighting. The ability to predict the manner and degree to which each individual astronaut will be affected would improve the effectiveness of countermeasure training programs designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. We hypothesize participant's ability to utilize individual sensory information (vision, proprioception and vestibular) influences adaptation in sensorimotor performance after space flight. The goal of this study is to develop a reliable protocol to test proprioceptive utilization in a functional postural control task. Subjects "stand" in a supine position while strapped to a backpack frame holding a friction-free device using air-bearings that allow the subject to move freely in the frontal plane, similar to when in upright standing. The frame is attached to a pneumatic cylinder, which can provide different levels of a gravity-like force that the subject must balance against to remain "upright". The supine posture with eyes closed ensures reduced vestibular and visual contribution to postural control suggesting somatosensory and/or non-otolith vestibular inputs will provide relevant information for maintaining balance control in this task. This setup is called the gravity bed. Fourteen healthy subjects carried out three trials each with eyes open alternated with eyes closed, "standing" on their dominant leg in the gravity bed environment while loaded with 60 percent of their body weight. Subjects were instructed to: "use your sense of sway about the ankle and pressure changes under the foot to maintain balance." Maximum length of a trial was 45 seconds. A force plate underneath the foot recorded forces and moments during the trial and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) attached on the backpack's frame near the center of mass of the subject recorded upper body postural responses. Series of linear and non-linear analyses were carried out on several force plate and IMU data including stabilogram diffusion analysis on the center of pressure (COP) to find a subset of parameters that were sensitive to detect differences in postural performance between eyes open and closed conditions. Results revealed that seven parameters (root mean square (RMS) of medio-lateral (ML) COP, range of ML COP, RMS of roll moment, range of trunk roll, minimum time-to-boundary (TTB), integrated TTB, and critical mean square planar displacement (delta r (sup 2) (sub c)) were significantly different between eyes open and closed conditions. We will present data to show the efficacy of using performance in single leg stance with eyes closed on the gravity bed to assess individuals' ability to utilize proprioceptive information in a functional postural control task to predict re-adaptation for sensorimotor and functional performance.
    Keywords: Aerospace Medicine
    Type: JSC-CN-34840 , 2016 NASA Human Research Program Investigators'' Workshop (HRP IWS 2016); 8-11 Feb. 2016; Galveston, TX; United States
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2019-08-13
    Description: Astronauts experience Postflight disturbances in postural and locomotor control due to sensorimotor adaptation to the unique environment of spaceflight. These alterations might have adverse consequences if a rapid egress were required following a Mars landing or on return to Earth after a water landing. Currently, no operational countermeasure is targeted to mitigate Postflight balance and locomotor dysfunction.
    Keywords: Aerospace Medicine
    Type: JSC-CN-38468 , Human Research Program Investigators'' Workshop (HRP IWS 2017); Jan 23, 2017 - Jan 26, 2017; Galveston, TX; United States
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2019-08-13
    Description: Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during their initial exposure to microgravity and during the re-adaptation phase following a return to an Earth-gravitational environment. These alterations may disrupt crewmembers' ability to perform mission critical functional tasks requiring ambulation, manual control and gaze stability. Interestingly, astronauts who return from spaceflight show substantial differences in their abilities to readapt to a gravitational environment. The ability to predict the manner and degree to which individual astronauts are affected will improve the effectiveness of countermeasure training programs designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. For such an approach to succeed, we must develop predictive measures of sensorimotor adaptability that will allow us to foresee, before actual spaceflight, which crewmembers are likely to experience greater challenges to their adaptive capacities. The goals of this project are to identify and characterize this set of predictive measures. Our approach includes: 1) behavioral tests to assess sensory bias and adaptability quantified using both strategic and plastic-adaptive responses; 2) imaging to determine individual brain morphological and functional features, using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging, resting state functional connectivity MRI, and sensorimotor adaptation task-related functional brain activation; and 3) assessment of genetic polymorphisms in the catechol-O-methyl transferase, dopamine receptor D2, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor genes and genetic polymorphisms of alpha2-adrenergic receptors that play a role in the neural pathways underlying sensorimotor adaptation. We anticipate that these predictive measures will be significantly correlated with individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability after long-duration spaceflight and exposure to an analog bed rest environment. We will be conducting a retrospective study, leveraging data already collected from relevant ongoing or completed bed rest and spaceflight studies. This data will be combined with predictor metrics that will be collected prospectively (as described for behavioral, brain imaging and genomic measures) from these returning subjects to build models for predicting post spaceflight and bed rest adaptive capability. In this presentation we will discuss the optimized set of tests for predictive metrics to be used for evaluating post mission adaptive capability as manifested in their outcome measures. Comparisons of model performance will allow us to better design and implement sensorimotor adaptability training countermeasures against decrements in post-mission adaptive capability that are customized for each crewmember's sensory biases, adaptive ability, brain structure, brain function, and genetic predispositions. The ability to customize adaptability training will allow more efficient use of crew time during training and will optimize training prescriptions for astronauts to mitigate the deleterious effects of spaceflight.
    Keywords: Aerospace Medicine; Behavioral Sciences
    Type: JSC-CN-38005 , Human Research Program Investigators'' Workshop; Jan 23, 2017 - Jan 27, 2017; Galveston, TX; United States
    Format: application/pdf
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