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  • 1
    ISSN: 0301-0104
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    College Park, Md. : American Institute of Physics (AIP)
    The Journal of Chemical Physics 97 (1992), S. 1905-1910 
    ISSN: 1089-7690
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics , Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: We study a two-level system described by a Hamiltonian which exhibits a time-periodic variation of its diagonal matrix elements in the small coupling regime. We investigate the transition probability, the Bloch–Siegert shift, and the Rabi frequency of the multiquantum transition as functions of the amplitude and frequency of the oscillations. These quantities all exhibit a very distinct behavior depending upon whether or not the amplitude of the oscillations allows for the crossing of the levels. This behavior is monotonic for small amplitudes while it presents oscillations as a function of the frequency for larger amplitudes. These oscillations are unambiguously attributed to the Landau–Zener–Stueckelberg interference effects between the crossing point and the turning point. A discussion of the relevance of these oscillations to possible experimental observations, notably in electron-transfer reactions, is presented.
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  • 4
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-04-06
    Description: CD8 T cells play a key role in mediating protective immunity against selected pathogens after vaccination. Understanding the mechanism of this protection is dependent upon definition of the heterogeneity and complexity of cellular immune responses generated by different vaccines. Here, we identify previously unrecognized subsets of CD8 T cells based upon analysis of gene-expression patterns within single cells and show that they are differentially induced by different vaccines. Three prime-boost vector combinations encoding HIV Env stimulated antigen-specific CD8 T-cell populations of similar magnitude, phenotype, and functionality. Remarkably, however, analysis of single-cell gene-expression profiles enabled discrimination of a majority of central memory (CM) and effector memory (EM) CD8 T cells elicited by the three vaccines. Subsets of T cells could be defined based on their expression of Eomes, Cxcr3, and Ccr7, or Klrk1, Klrg1, and Ccr5 in CM and EM cells, respectively. Of CM cells elicited by DNA prime-recombinant adenoviral (rAd) boost vectors, 67% were Eomes− Ccr7+ Cxcr3−, in contrast to only 7% and 2% stimulated by rAd5-rAd5 or rAd-LCMV, respectively. Of EM cells elicited by DNA-rAd, 74% were Klrk1− Klrg1−Ccr5− compared with only 26% and 20% for rAd5-rAd5 or rAd5-LCMV. Definition by single-cell gene profiling of specific CM and EM CD8 T-cell subsets that are differentially induced by different gene-based vaccines will facilitate the design and evaluation of vaccines, as well as enable our understanding of mechanisms of protective immunity.
    Print ISSN: 0027-8424
    Electronic ISSN: 1091-6490
    Topics: Biology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2016-04-21
    Description: Our current understanding of immunology was largely defined in laboratory mice, partly because they are inbred and genetically homogeneous, can be genetically manipulated, allow kinetic tissue analyses to be carried out from the onset of disease, and permit the use of tractable disease models. Comparably reductionist experiments are neither technically nor ethically possible in humans. However, there is growing concern that laboratory mice do not reflect relevant aspects of the human immune system, which may account for failures to translate disease treatments from bench to bedside. Laboratory mice live in abnormally hygienic specific pathogen free (SPF) barrier facilities. Here we show that standard laboratory mouse husbandry has profound effects on the immune system and that environmental changes produce mice with immune systems closer to those of adult humans. Laboratory mice--like newborn, but not adult, humans--lack effector-differentiated and mucosally distributed memory T cells. These cell populations were present in free-living barn populations of feral mice and pet store mice with diverse microbial experience, and were induced in laboratory mice after co-housing with pet store mice, suggesting that the environment is involved in the induction of these cells. Altering the living conditions of mice profoundly affected the cellular composition of the innate and adaptive immune systems, resulted in global changes in blood cell gene expression to patterns that more closely reflected the immune signatures of adult humans rather than neonates, altered resistance to infection, and influenced T-cell differentiation in response to a de novo viral infection. These data highlight the effects of environment on the basal immune state and response to infection and suggest that restoring physiological microbial exposure in laboratory mice could provide a relevant tool for modelling immunological events in free-living organisms, including humans.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4871315/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4871315/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Beura, Lalit K -- Hamilton, Sara E -- Bi, Kevin -- Schenkel, Jason M -- Odumade, Oludare A -- Casey, Kerry A -- Thompson, Emily A -- Fraser, Kathryn A -- Rosato, Pamela C -- Filali-Mouhim, Ali -- Sekaly, Rafick P -- Jenkins, Marc K -- Vezys, Vaiva -- Haining, W Nicholas -- Jameson, Stephen C -- Masopust, David -- 1R01AI111671/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI075168/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI084913/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI111671/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI116678/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01AI075168/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01AI084913/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01AI116678/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Apr 28;532(7600):512-6. doi: 10.1038/nature17655. Epub 2016 Apr 20.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Center for Immunology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55414, USA. ; Center for Immunology, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55414, USA. ; Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27096360" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Animal Husbandry/*methods ; Animals ; Animals, Laboratory/*immunology ; Animals, Wild/*immunology ; Cell Differentiation ; *Environment ; Environmental Exposure ; Female ; Humans ; Immune System/*immunology ; Immunity/*immunology ; Immunity, Innate/immunology ; Immunologic Memory ; Infant, Newborn ; Male ; Mice ; *Models, Animal ; Phenotype ; Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms ; T-Lymphocytes/cytology/immunology ; Virus Diseases/immunology/virology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2016-04-28
    Description: Normalizing the environment recapitulates adult human immune traits in laboratory mice Nature 532, 7600 (2016). doi:10.1038/nature17655 Authors: Lalit K. Beura, Sara E. Hamilton, Kevin Bi, Jason M. Schenkel, Oludare A. Odumade, Kerry A. Casey, Emily A. Thompson, Kathryn A. Fraser, Pamela C. Rosato, Ali Filali-Mouhim, Rafick P. Sekaly, Marc K. Jenkins, Vaiva Vezys, W. Nicholas Haining, Stephen C. Jameson & David Masopust Our current understanding of immunology was largely defined in laboratory mice, partly because they are inbred and genetically homogeneous, can be genetically manipulated, allow kinetic tissue analyses to be carried out from the onset of disease, and permit the use of tractable disease models. Comparably reductionist experiments are neither technically nor ethically possible in humans. However, there is growing concern that laboratory mice do not reflect relevant aspects of the human immune system, which may account for failures to translate disease treatments from bench to bedside. Laboratory mice live in abnormally hygienic specific pathogen free (SPF) barrier facilities. Here we show that standard laboratory mouse husbandry has profound effects on the immune system and that environmental changes produce mice with immune systems closer to those of adult humans. Laboratory mice—like newborn, but not adult, humans—lack effector-differentiated and mucosally distributed memory T cells. These cell populations were present in free-living barn populations of feral mice and pet store mice with diverse microbial experience, and were induced in laboratory mice after co-housing with pet store mice, suggesting that the environment is involved in the induction of these cells. Altering the living conditions of mice profoundly affected the cellular composition of the innate and adaptive immune systems, resulted in global changes in blood cell gene expression to patterns that more closely reflected the immune signatures of adult humans rather than neonates, altered resistance to infection, and influenced T-cell differentiation in response to a de novo viral infection. These data highlight the effects of environment on the basal immune state and response to infection and suggest that restoring physiological microbial exposure in laboratory mice could provide a relevant tool for modelling immunological events in free-living organisms, including humans.
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Published by Springer Nature
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