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1.
BOOK
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Call number: SR 90.1026(82)
Location: Building A17
Branch Library: GFZ Library
Pages: 20 S.
2.
BOOK
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Call number: SR 90.1026(74)
Location: Building A17
Branch Library: GFZ Library
Pages: 24 S.
3.
BOOK
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Energy spectrum and evidence for Extragalactic Origin of diffuse Gamma-Radiation in the MeV-Range (1974)
Garching bei München
Call number: SR 90.1026(95)
Location: Building A17
Branch Library: GFZ Library
Pages: 12 S.
4.
BOOK
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Diffuse cosmic and Atmospheric MeV gamma radiation from balloon observations (1977)
Garching bei München
Call number: SR 90.1026(133)
Location: Building A17
Branch Library: GFZ Library
Pages: 35 S.
5.
PAPER
Gamma ray astronomy and search for antimatter in the universe (1989)
Hyperfine interactions 44 (1989), S. 85-96 
ISSN: 1572-9540
Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
Notes: Abstract Gamma ray astronomy provides a powerful tool for searching antimatter in the universe; it probably provides the only means to determine, if the universe has baryon symmetry. Presently existing gamma-ray observations can be interpreted without postulating the existence of antimatter. However, the measurements are not precise enough to definitely exclude the possibility of its existence. The search for antimatter belongs to one of the main scientific objectives of the Gamma Ray Observatory GRO of NASA, which will be launched in 1990 by the Space Shuttle.
Type of Medium: 1
6.
PAPER
Emission from 44Ti associated with a previously unknown Galactic supernova (1998)
London [u.a.]
Nature 396 (1998), S. 142-144 
ISSN: 1476-4687
Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2007
Notes: Nearly 400 years have passed since a supernova was last observed directly in the Milky Way (by Kepler, in 1604). Numerous Galactic supernovae are expected to have occurred since then, but only one (Cassiopeia A) may have been seen. The historical record of supernovae is therefore incomplete, as demonstrated by the spatial distribution of young supernova remnants. The discovery, of γ-ray emission from the decay of 44Ti nuclei associated with Cassiopeia A, the youngest known remnant, has revealed a new way to search for the remnants of other relatively recent supernovae (less than ∼1,000 years old). Here we report the discovery of 44Ti line emission from a previously unknown young supernova remnant, in the direction of the Vela remnant. We estimate a distance of ∼200 parsecs and an age of ∼680 years for the remnant, making it the closest young remnant to the Earth. Why it was not recorded historically remains unknown.
Type of Medium: 1
7.
PAPER
Is there a common origin for the cosmic γ-ray lines at 0.51 and 1.81 MeV near the galactic centre? (1986)
London [u.a.]
Nature 323 (1986), S. 692-694 
ISSN: 1476-4687
Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2007
Notes: The discovery of the 1.81-MeV 26Al decay line in the present interstellar medium1 provided direct experimental proof that intermediate mass nuclei are being synthesized continuously in the Galaxy. The instruments making this and a subsequent observation2 had broad angular responses, thus, although both observations were consistent with a source near the centre of the Galaxy, interpretations for the origin of this radiation have included objects distributed throughout the Galaxy capable of synthesizing 26Al, such as type II supernova, Wolf Rayet stars, novae and red giants. New observations3 have localized this source to the galactic centre region consistent with a point source at the centre within the resolution function of the telescope (∼10° FWHM, full width at half maximum). Observations of the galactic 0.51-MeV positron annihilation line have also localized this line to the galactic centre with an angular resolution ∼15° FWHM4. Time variability requires that it come from a region ∼1 pc in size, hence it is probably produced near a compact object at or near the galactic centre5. Here we discuss the possibility that the 0.51- and 1.81-MeV lines have a common origin: the initial decay of 26Al to 26Mg with the most probable emission of a positron which eventually annihilates producing the 0.51-MeV line, followed by the decay of 26Mg to the ground state with the emission of the 1.81-MeV line. For this process to be solely responsible for both lines the time-integrated intensities of the lines must be compatible, and we show that this is not contradicted by the existing data. The measurement of the properties of the two lines individually and taken together place strong constraints on the source region of this radiation.
Type of Medium: 1
8.
PAPER
ISSN: 1476-4687
Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2007
Notes: The Milky Way is known to be an abundant source of γ-ray photons, now determined to be mainly diffuse in nature and resulting from interstellar processes. In the soft γ-ray domain, point sources are expected to dominate, but the lack of sensitive high-resolution observations did not allow for a clear estimate of the contribution from such sources. Even the best imaging experiment revealed only a few point sources, accounting for about 50% of the total Galactic flux. Theoretical studies were unable to explain the remaining intense diffuse emission. Investigating the origin of the soft γ-rays is therefore necessary to determine the dominant particle acceleration processes and to gain insights into the physical and chemical equilibrium of the interstellar medium. Here we report observations in the soft γ-ray domain that reveal numerous compact sources. We show that these sources account for the entirety of the Milky Way's emission in soft γ-rays, leaving at most a minor role for diffuse processes.
Type of Medium: 1
9.
PAPER
No indication of excess MeV gamma radiation from the Crab Nebula (1975)
London [u.a.]
Nature 257 (1975), S. 375-376 
ISSN: 1476-4687
Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2007
Notes: DURING the past two years results from two different balloon experiments1,2 indicate that the γ-ray emission from the Crab Nebula between 1 and 10 MeV is considerably above the straight line interpolation from lower and higher photon energies. The excess above the power law has been claimed to be factor of 7 between 1 and 3 MeV and of a factor 30 between 3 and 10 MeV. The fact that both experiments yielded nearly identical results gives support to the reality of the excess component. The power in this excess is nearly as large as the total integrated synchrotron power of 2×10−7 erg cm−2 s−1 of the Crab Nebula. It has been speculated that this powerful, narrow-band component may be produced in the pulsar magnetosphere, possibly near the surface of the neutron star2.
Type of Medium: 1
10.
PAPER
Origin of MeV-excess in the energy spectrum of diffuse cosmic γ rays (1978)
London [u.a.]
Nature 274 (1978), S. 344-346 
ISSN: 1476-4687
Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2007
Notes: THE origin of the diffuse cosmic γ radiation has been widely discussed. It is either interpreted as the result of interactions in intergalactic space or as the result of the superposition of many unresolved external galaxies. Strong support for the latter hypothesis is given by our measurements of the energy spectrum of the Seyfert galaxy NGC4151 up to 10 MeV with the MPI Compton telescope1 which are reported here.
Type of Medium: 1