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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-12-16
    Type: Conference or Workshop Item , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-05-09
    Description: Oblique shear directions along the left lateral strike-slip Dead Sea transform (DST) fault caused the formation of the Dead Sea Basin (DSB), one of the world's largest pull-apart basins. The Dead Sea, which covers the northern part of the basin, is one of the most saline lakes in world. To understand interaction of saline water from the Dead Sea with the neighbouring hydrological system is an important geoscientific problem for this arid region. Here, we report on the first continuous magnetotelluric (MT) transect crossing the entire DSB, from the eastern to the western rift shoulders and beyond. 2-D inversion of the MT data reveals an unprecedented comprehensive picture of the subsurface structures from the basin and adjacent areas. Quaternary to recent sediments of the Al-Lisan/Samara formations are expressed as highly conductive structures reaching a depth of approximately 4 km. East and west of the rift valley layered sequences of resistive and conductive structures coincide with the sedimentary formations of the Cretaceous, Jurassic and Triassic. Pre-Cambrian basement (crystalized igneous rocks) appears at depths 〉3 km beneath both rift shoulders as very resistive regions. The eastern boundary fault of the DST is associated with a sharp lateral conductivity contrast between the highly resistive basement structures and the conductive fill of the DSB. The transition to the western rift shoulder appears wider and smoother, in agreement with a broader fractured region, possibly caused by a combination of strong normal faulting and strike-slip activity. The very high conductivities of less than 1 m of the Al-Lisan/Samara formations can be explained with hypersaline waters of the Dead Sea reaching depths of a few kilometres and porosities of at least 37 per cent. The regional Judea and Kurnub aquifers of the Cretaceous are imaged as conductive layers with resistivities of 1–20 m and we infer porosities of 15 per cent. The low resistivities observed in the Jurassic/Triassic formations can be explained with highly saline or saturated brines and a porosity of 7 per cent. From the electrical conductivity images and estimating porosities of the sedimentary rocks, we can infer salinities of the various aquifers. For the Al-Lisan/Samara formations, salinities reach values 〉50 g l –1 in the upper 1.7 km. The Judea, Kurnub and Jurassic/Triassic aquifers have a more inhomogeneous distribution of salinity with highest values observed between normal faults at the western rift shoulder.
    Print ISSN: 0956-540X
    Electronic ISSN: 1365-246X
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Deutsche Geophysikalische Gesellschaft (DGG) and the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS).
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-10-27
    Description: We report on a study to explore the deep electrical conductivity structure of the Dead Sea Basin (DSB) using magnetotelluric (MT) data collected along a transect across the DSB where the left lateral strike-slip Dead Sea transform (DST) fault splits into two fault strands forming one of the largest pull-apart basins of the world. A very pronounced feature of our 2-D inversion model is a deep, subvertical conductive zone beneath the DSB. The conductor extends through the entire crust and is sandwiched between highly resistive structures associated with Precambrian rocks of the basin flanks. The high electrical conductivity could be attributed to fluids released by dehydration of the uppermost mantle beneath the DSB, possibly in combination with fluids released by mid- to low-grade metamorphism in the lower crust and generation of hydrous minerals in the middle crust through retrograde metamorphism. Similar high conductivity zones associated with fluids have been reported from other large fault systems. The presence of fluids and hydrous minerals in the middle and lower crust could explain the required low friction coefficient of the DST along the eastern boundary of the DSB and the high subsidence rate of basin sediments. 3-D inversion models confirm the existence of a subvertical high conductivity structure underneath the DSB but its expression is far less pronounced. Instead, the 3-D inversion model suggests a deepening of the conductive DSB sediments off-profile towards the south, reaching a maximum depth of approximately 12 km, which is consistent with other geophysical observations. At shallower levels, the 3-D inversion model reveals salt diapirism as an upwelling of highly resistive structures, localized underneath the Al-Lisan Peninsula. The 3-D model furthermore contains an E–W elongated conductive structure to the northeast of the DSB. More MT data with better spatial coverage are required, however, to fully constrain the robustness of the above-mentioned off-profile features.
    Keywords: Geodynamics and Tectonics
    Print ISSN: 0956-540X
    Electronic ISSN: 1365-246X
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Deutsche Geophysikalische Gesellschaft (DGG) and the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS).
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2016-11-04
    Description: As a consequence of measuring time variations of the electric and the magnetic field, which are related to current flow and charge distribution, magnetotelluric (MT) data in 2-D and 3-D environments are not only sensitive to the geoelectrical structures below the measuring points but also to any lateral anomalies surrounding the acquisition site. This behaviour complicates the characterization of the electrical resistivity distribution of the subsurface, particularly in complex areas. In this manuscript we assess the main advantages of complementing the standard MT impedance tensor ( Z ) data with interstation horizontal magnetic tensor ( H ) and geomagnetic transfer function ( T ) data in constraining the subsurface in a 3-D environment beneath a MT profile. Our analysis was performed using synthetic responses with added normally distributed and scattered random noise. The sensitivity of each type of data to different resistivity anomalies was evaluated, showing that the degree to which each site and each period is affected by the same anomaly depends on the type of data. A dimensionality analysis, using Z , H and T data, identified the presence of the 3-D anomalies close to the profile, suggesting a 3-D approach for recovering the electrical resistivity values of the subsurface. Finally, the capacity for recovering the geoelectrical structures of the subsurface was evaluated by performing joint inversion using different data combinations, quantifying the differences between the true synthetic model and the models from inversion process. Four main improvements were observed when performing joint inversion of Z , H and T data: (1) superior precision and accuracy at characterizing the electrical resistivity values of the anomalies below and outside the profile; (2) the potential to recover high electrical resistivity anomalies that are poorly recovered using Z data alone; (3) improvement in the characterization of the bottom and lateral boundaries of the anomalies with low electrical resistivity; and (4) superior imaging of the horizontal continuity of structures with low electrical resistivity. These advantages offer new opportunities for the MT method by making the results from a MT profile in a 3-D environment more convincing, supporting the possibility of high-resolution studies in 3-D areas without expending a large amount of economical and computational resources, and also offering better resolution of targets with high electrical resistivity.
    Keywords: Geomagnetism, Rock Magnetism and Palaeomagnetism
    Print ISSN: 0956-540X
    Electronic ISSN: 1365-246X
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Deutsche Geophysikalische Gesellschaft (DGG) and the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS).
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2019-01-11
    Description: We present a deep electrical resistivity image from the passive continental margin in Namibia. The approximately 700 km long magnetotelluric profile follows the Walvis Ridge offshore, continues onshore across the Kaoko Mobile Belt and reaches onto the Congo Craton. Two-dimensional inversion reveals moderately resistive material offshore, atypically low for oceanic lithosphere, reaching depths of 15–20 km. Such moderate resistivities are consistent with seismic P wave velocity models, which suggest up to 35 km thick crust. The Neoproterozoic rocks of the Kaoko Mobile Belt are resistive, but NNW-striking major shear-zones are imaged as subvertical, conductive structures in the upper and middle crust. Since the geophysical imprint of the shear zones is intact, opening of the South Atlantic in the Cretaceous did not alter the middle crust. The transition into the cratonic region coincides with a deepening of the high-resistive material to depths of more than 60 km.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
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