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1.
BOOK
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Climate change and society : sociological perspectives : report of the American Sociological Association's Task Force on Sociology and Global Climate Change (2015)
New York, NY : Oxford Univ. Press
Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
Pages: XVII, 460 S., graph. Darst., Kt.
ISBN: 9780199356119 (pbk.) | 9780199356102 (hardcover)
Branch Library: IASS Library
2.
BOOK
get availability status
Handbook of environmental sociology (2002)
Westport, Conn. [u.a.] : Greenwood Press
Call number: IASS 12.0053
Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
Pages: X, 602 S. : graph. Darst. ; 24 cm
ISBN: 0313268088
Branch Library: IASS Library
3.
Paper (German National Licenses)
Environmentalism and elitism: a conceptual and empirical analysis (1986)
Springer
Environmental management 10 (1986), S. 581-589 
ISSN: 1432-1009
Keywords Elitism ; Environmentalism ; Environmental movement ; Environmental policy ; Equity ; Public attitudes ; Social movements
Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
Topics: Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering
Notes: Abstract The frequent charge that environmentalism is “elitist” is examined conceptually and empirically. First, the concept of elitism is analyzed by distinguishing between three types of accusations made against the environmental movement: (a)compositional elitism suggests that environmentalists are drawn from privileged socioeconomic strata, (b)ideological elitism suggests that environmental reforms are a subterfuge for distributing benefits to environmentalists and/or costs to others, and (c)impact elitism suggests that environmental reforms, whether intentionally or not, do in fact have regressive social impacts. The evidence bearing on each of the three types of elitism is examined in some detail, and the following conclusions are drawn: Compositional elitism is an exaggeration, for although environmentalists are typically above average in socioeconomic status (as are most sociopolitical activists), few belong to the upper class. Ideological elitism may hold in some instances, but environmentalists have shown increasing sensitivity to equity concerns and there is little evidence of consistent pursuit of self-interest. Impact elitism is the most important issue, and also the most difficult to assess. It appears that there has been a general tendency for environmental reforms to have regressive impacts. However, it is increasingly recognized that problems such as workplace pollution and toxic waste contamination disproportionately affect the lower socioeconomic strata, and thus reforms aimed at such problems will likely have more progressive impacts.
Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
4.
Paper (German National Licenses)
The Impact of Political Orientation on Environmental Attitudes and Actions (1975)
Beverly Hills, Calif. : Periodicals Archive Online (PAO)
Environment and behavior. 7:4 (1975:Dec.) 428 
ISSN: 0013-9165
Topics: Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering , Psychology
5.
Paper (German National Licenses)
Environmental Concern: "Does It Make a Difference How It's Measured"? (1981)
Beverly Hills, Calif. : Periodicals Archive Online (PAO)
Environment and behavior. 13:6 (1981:Nov.) 651 
ISSN: 0013-9165
Topics: Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering , Psychology
6.
PAPER CURRENT
Increasing Influence of Party Identification on Perceived Scientific Agreement and Support for Government Action on Climate Change in the United States, 2006–12 (2014)
American Meteorological Society
Publication Date: 2014-04-01
Print ISSN: 1948-8327
Electronic ISSN: 1948-8335
Topics: Geosciences , Physics
7.
PAPER CURRENT
Perceived scientific agreement and support for government action on climate change in the USA (2013)
Springer Science + Business Media
Publication Date: 2013-07-01
Description: Given the well-documented campaign in the USA to deny the reality and seriousness of anthropogenic climate change (a major goal of which is to “manufacture uncertainty” in the minds of policy-makers and the general public), we examine the influence that perception of the scientific agreement on global warming has on the public’s beliefs about global warming and support for government action to reduce emissions. A recent study by Ding et al. (Nat Clim Chang 1:462–466, 2011 ) using nationally representative survey data from 2010 finds that misperception of scientific agreement among climate scientists is associated with lower levels of support for climate policy and beliefs that action should be taken to deal with global warming. Our study replicates and extends Ding et al. (Nat Clim Chang 1:462–466, 2011 ) using nationally representative survey data from March 2012. We generally confirm their findings, suggesting that the crucial role of perceived scientific agreement on views of global warming and support for climate policy is robust. Further, we show that political orientation has a significant influence on perceived scientific agreement, global warming beliefs, and support for government action to reduce emissions. Our results suggest the importance of improving public perception of the scientific agreement on global warming, but in ways that do not trigger or aggravate ideological or partisan divisions. ©2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Print ISSN: 0165-0009
Electronic ISSN: 1573-1480
Topics: Geosciences , Physics

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