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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2007-11-29
    Description: The Nelson Mineral Belt, part of the Dun Mountain Ophiolite Belt of Permian age, in the north of the South Island of New Zealand, was the subject of intense interest soon after the European settlement of New Zealand owing to the discovery of copper and chromite mineralization. The first geologist to survey the Mineral Belt in east Nelson was Thomas Ridge Hacket (c. 18301884), who arrived from Britain in 1857, although he was primarily interested in the mineralization. The first scientific description of the belt followed the visit in 1859 of the geologist Ferdinand von Hochstetter (18291884) of the Austrian Geological Survey who regarded the belt as a sill. He recognized that Dun Mountain was not serpentinite, like the rest of the belt, but an olivine-rich rock that he named dunite. von Hochstetter tentatively considered that thick mafic rocks of the Brook Street Volcanics, that were then considered to be intrusives rather than sedimentary, may have been a correlative of the Mineral Belt. Between the belt and the Brook Street rocks he mapped the Wooded Peak Limestone and Maitai Slates. von Hochstetter tentatively assigned a Mesozoic age to all of the above rocks and for nearly 100 years Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in many parts of New Zealand were regarded as a correlative of the Maitai Slates. Both Hacket and von Hochstetter confirmed an abundance of chromite in the Mineral Belt, a finding that resulted in the building of New Zealand's first railway. Mining was short-lived but hopes were raised that gold might be found following Hacket's move to Queensland in the late 1860s. He recognized that the Gympie gold-fields had many similarities with Dun Mountain and reasoned that east Nelson might also be auriferous. This was taken up by men in Nelson such as Sir David Monro (18131877) and William Wells (18101893) who were keen geological observers, and by Monro's son in law Dr, later Sir James, Hector (18341907) who was director of the New Zealand Geological Survey. In 1870, Hector arranged for Edward Heydelbach Davis (18451871) to undertake a detailed examination of the Permo-Triassic rocks of east Nelson. Davis, like Hacket, regarded the Mineral Belt as metamorphosed Maitai rocks. As well as demonstrating that the east Nelson rocks did not contain economic concentrations of gold, copper or chromite, Davis showed that they were distinct from what had been thought to be similar rocks in the Coromandel gold-fields in North Island of New Zealand. This was the first, if not fully appreciated, step to limit the Maitai rocks. Hacket's correlation of the Gympie and Dun Mountain rocks was forgotten until the advent of plate tectonics. The various major rock units in Nelson are now recognized as terranes that accumulated as a result of convergent plate tectonics along the Mesozoic margin of Gondwanaland.
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1550-7408
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: SYNOPSIS. Haemogregarina bigemina was found in all Blennius pholis which exceeded 5.0 cm in length, but in none measuring less than 3.5 cm. No exoerythrocytic development was recorded. The first B. pholis eggs hatched in May while the first patent infections of H. bigemina occurred from September onward in metamorphosed fish. Consequently, if the life cycle of H. bigemina includes a vector, that organism is active between May and September at least. Circumstantial evidence indicates that the hematophagous isopod, Gnathia maxillaris and not leeches, could be a vector of H. bigemina. Developmental stages of sporozoa were found in a small number of the isopods which had fed on infected B. pholis but the parasites could not be identified as H. bigemina with certainty. Subcellular organization, typical of sporozoa, was recorded by electron microscopy of H. bigemina.
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1550-7408
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: SYNOPSIS. A study was made of the fine structure of some stages in the life cycle of an undesignated species of Isospora parasitic in a gecko. The merozoites which lay within a membrane-bound periparasitic vacuole in the host epithelial cell, had a striking similarity to Plasmodium, Lankesterella, Toxoplasma, Besnoitia, Sarcocystis, Eimeria and the M-organism. Each merozoite was invested with a triple-layered pellicle, the outer membrane of which was loosely applied. At the anterior end of the merozoite were conoid and apical rings; microtubules terminated in the posterior apical ring. Other organelles included nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, micropyle, paired organelle, toxonemes and a variety of vacuoles. Although the sequence of development of the merozoite was not completely followed, some events in this process were recorded. The evidence suggests that anterior ends are formed early and that merozoites develop subsequently by a process of budding. The merozoite pellicle appears to be continuous with, altho structurally different from, the investing membrane of the parent cell.
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1520-6882
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
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  • 5
    ISSN: 1520-5118
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1750-3841
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Myo-inositol bis-, tris-, tetrakis-, pentakis- and hexakisphosphates (IP2–6) were quantified in nine thermally processed or fermented food products. Total inositol phosphate content (mmol/kg dry weight) ranged from 1.35 in white bread to 23.26 in tofu and 26.05 in soy isolate. In all foods analyzed, inositol hexakisphosphate (phytic acid) accounted for more than 40% of the total inositol phosphates on a molar basis. Step-gradient ion exchange and ferric chloride precipitation methods for phytate determination were evaluated with a soy isolate sample to which inositol phosphates or adenosine triphosphate (ATP) had been added individually. Both methods measured all of the inositol phosphates, while the former also measured ATP.
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1750-3841
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: An ion chromatographic method to determine phytic acid in foods, which allows for the direct injection of extracts into the column without need of a prepurification step, was developed. Infant formula powder, soy flour, soy isolate, wheat bran, and wheat bread were analyzed using the new ion chromatographic method and an ion exchange method. Phytic acid determined with the ion chromatographic method ranged from 0.2% for infant formula powder to 3.28% for wheat bran. The generally lower values found using the ion chromatographic method compared to the ion exchange method are attributed to the measurement of interfering substances such as breakdown products of phytic acid by the ion exchange procedure.
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1750-3841
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1750-3841
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: SUMMARY —Small white potatoes were heated with microwave energy followed by boiling water to determine the penetration of heat, inactivation of peroxidase and firmness of the potatoes. Treatments consisted of heating potatoes with microwave energy for 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 min followed by boiling water for 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 min. Temperature measurements were made at depths of 0.75 and 1.5 cm using tubers with a mean radius of 1.95 cm. Peroxidase inactivation was measured along the radius of a slice removed from the equatorial region. Firmness was determined by the ALLO-Kramer shear press. Potatoes, when heated by microwave energy, became hot first at the core with a heat gradient developing toward the periphery. Boiling water produced a heat gradient from the periphery toward the core. Consequently, the tissue located about midway of the radius was subjected to the least amount of heat. The minimum time required to completely inactivate peroxidase and the firmness values of the potato tissue at the time of enzymatic inactivation were as follows: 1.5 min microwaves and 3 min boiling water, 119 lb shear force; and 2 min microwaves and 2 min boiling water, 124 lb shear force. Peroxidase was not completely destroyed when the potatoes were subjected to energy for 1 min or less followed by heating in boiling water up to 5 min.
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  • 10
    ISSN: 0362-2525
    Keywords: Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: The axillary sinus of G. variegata is formed from a perivascular lymphatic which locally invests the lateral vein. Within the sinus the wall of the vein is distended by lymphoid tissue which is itself supported by reticular fibres. Lymphocytes, reticular cells, macrophages and mast cells occur in the tissue. The overall appearance of the structure is lymph node-like. Although Cardianema sp. (Nematoda:Filarioidea) parasitised the lymphatic system of some geckos examined, the non-pathologic origin of the lymphoid tissue is indicated by its presence in both axillae of infected and uninfected geckos alike. Comparison is made with lymph nodes and node-like structures in other vertebrates.
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